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Kubuntu not quite right for a Tablet PC

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Ubuntu

Linux is known for running well (or at least running) on older hardware and exotic platforms. I attempted to install Kubuntu Dapper Drake (6.10) on a Compaq TC1000 Tablet PC. I discovered that while Linux may install on nearly every platform, and run faster than its proprietary competition, it may not always be the best-fitting choice for every environment.

The TC1000, released back in 2003, comes with a Transmeta Crusoe processor running at 1.0GHz, 384MB of RAM (mine was upgraded from the 256MB on-board), a 30GB hard drive, 802.11b wireless, and an Intel e100 10/100 NIC, along with a 10.8-inch display with a pen digitizer. Another neat feature is a set of buttons along the top (in 1024x768/landscape) or right (in 768x1024/portrait) side of the screen that allow quick access to up/down, Ctrl-Alt-Del, Enter, Esc, Tab, and two configurable buttons, one marked with an email icon and the other a Q. I have found that the up/down toggle key (which doubles as an Enter key by pressing the switch in) is extremely useful for the tablet's best use: Web browsing. In portrait mode, the tablet excels at being a great form to view Web pages. The only problem is that most Web pages do not read well at 768 pixels wide. Many printer-friendly versions of pages seemed to work, however.

Enter Kubuntu

Pre-installed with the tablet was Windows XP Professional Tablet Edition. It ran too slow for my tastes, and I also wanted to install Linux. I'm a recent Kubuntu convert, so I chose the Dapper Drake release for my install.

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