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Virtually Speaking: Simplifying the Infrastructure

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Software

There are many well-documented advantages to virtualization. Now that the technology is deployed throughout the data center, the disadvantages are starting to surface.

One such disadvantage is rising complexity.

Although virtualization simplifies the infrastructure in some ways, in others it's equally complex and requires as much, if not more, administrative effort.

From workshops to keynotes, the pros and cons of virtualization surfaced frequently at this week's Interop show in New York City. CA CEO John Swainson's keynote was particularly focused on virtualization, citing the stat that during the next five years, the computing resources constituting today's typical IT infrastructure all will be virtualized.

Thus, tomorrow's admins will be wrangling with managing virtual complexity, as opposed to physical complexity.

Full Story.

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