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Christian video games

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Gaming

Will the spiritual and gaming worlds transcend their realms?

Hoping to tap into the same audience that has made Christian Pop music a force in the entertainment industry, some developers are betting that Christian-themed video games can claim a sizeable chunk of the $10 billion gaming market.

So far, games such as "Spiritual Warfare" and "Exodus: Journey to the Promised Land" have drawn a loyal following by combining biblical themes with mild action. Users can travel through biblical lands, solve puzzles based on scripture and, in some games, slash demonic foes.

Some Christian game developers are betting that Christian games are ready for a boom on the eve of the launch of next-generation gaming machines such as Sony Corp.'s PlayStation and Microsoft Corp.'s Xbox.

"There's a huge appetite for Christian games," said Bill Bean, co-founder of game developer Digital Praise, which already has two "Adventures in Odyssey" games for children 8 and up. In those games, children are taught lessons involving values like truth and honesty.

The company plans to release four games later this year that will move the company toward a higher age bracket and into games with more obvious Christian themes, Bean said.

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