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10 Programming Languages You Should Learn Right Now

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Knowing a handful of programming languages is seen by many as a harbor in a job market storm, solid skills that will be marketable as long as the languages are.

Yet, there is beauty in numbers. While there may be developers who have had riches heaped on them by knowing the right programming language at the right time in the right place, most longtime coders will tell you that periodically learning a new language is an essential part of being a good and successful Web developer.

"One of my mentors once told me that a programming language is just a programming language. It doesn't matter if you're a good programmer, it's the syntax that matters," Tim Huckaby, CEO of San Diego-based software engineering company CEO Interknowlogy.com, told eWEEK.

By picking the brains of Web developers and IT recruiters, eWEEK selected 10 programming languages that are a bonus for developers to add to their resumes.

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re: 10 programming...

I'll get started on that right away - NOT.

Many people can dabble in multiple programming languages, few are good at more then two or three (at any point in their career).

Like spoken language, to be good at something requires in depth immersion into that language on a daily basis. Few programmers have the time (or need) to maintain expert knowledge in more then one or two different languages.

As with most things, Quality is a better attribute to strive for then Quantity.

Only 10?

At last count I think I knew at least 35. I got so bored, that I started making up my own.

re: only 10?

I tried that, only PigC++ never really caught on.

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