Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mystery deepens around missing Oakland woman

Filed under
Reiser

Nine days have passed since Nina `Nenasha" Reiser was last seen dropping off her son and daughter at their father's Montclair home, and the mystery surrounding her disappearance deepened Tuesday.

Amidst revelations of a tumultuous divorce, police said they found the 31-year-old mother's missing 2001 Honda mini-van in another part of Montclair near Highway 13 last week.

In addition, police had her children, ages 5 and 6, removed from the custody of their father, Hans Reiser, last Friday and placed with county Child Protective Services.

A search of the van and the surrounding area, including hunts by specially-trained tracking dogs, have failed to produce any tangible leads, police said.

Nina Reiser was supposed to have picked up her children on Sept. 4 but did not do so, and a friend alerted the authorities.

Reiser was born and raised in Russia, where she practiced as a gynecologist, friends said. She moved to the United States in 2000, where she and her husband started a technology company.

Full Story.

tidbits

An Old Online Resume.

An Interview at kerneltrap, just about a year old.

Wikipedia Entry.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

re: tidbits

Too bad it's Reisers wife, otherwise you could just run autorecovery and fsck would probably find her.

**sorry, was just reading fark.com and the auto-smartass response flag hasn't been reset yet.

re: tidbits

Rolling On The Floor...

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

more info

Bay Area news reports state that "Police have still not been able to contact Hans Reiser since Sept. 5 to speak with him about his wife's disappearance. Police believe he is the last person to have seen his wife before she was reported missing on Sept. 4."

Wife of ReiserFS filesystem creator goes missing.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Hopefully they find her...

I was reading an article about this over at SFGate the other day, and actually snickered at the last name... I had no idea it was actually related to the filesystem. I didn't know it was named after anyone...

Hopefully they find her though... must be stressful on the family .

re: Hopefully they find her...

Yeah, I hope they do as well. When I first read of it, I investigated to be sure in my mind that it was indeed the Hans Reiser of reiserfs before posting about it. Then of course other linux sites picked up on it, dug deeper, and confirmed it as well.

I can't print in public what I think happened to her, but you can probably guess. I can say I fear she may never be found, at least alive. It's just so wicked that something like this could happen in our little Linux community.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux Foundation: Juniper/OpenContrail and Bell Canada at Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP)

  • Juniper Expands Contrail, Moves Open-Source Project to the Linux Foundation
    "Fortunately at Juniper we have a secrect weapon and one that i'm so very proud of and that's Contrail," Rami Rahim, Juniper Networks CEO said during his keynote. "The way we have been investing and innovating in Contrail over the last few years is sort of similar to how a car company would invest in a Formula 1 car, it's essentially a proving ground for the world's best technology." Rahim commented that the use-cases for Contrail so far have been somewhat limited, but that's about to change. "The future of Contrail is as a platform, a single controller that can solve a variety of really compelling use-cases with ease and simplicity," Rahim said. "Whether it's management of overlay and underlay, or SD-WAN connectivity, or multi-cloud fabric management." Juniper originally acquired Contrail in December 2012 in a deal valued at $176 million. In September 2013, Juniper open-sourcedthe Contrail technology, creating the OpenContrail project.
  • Juniper Networks' OpenContrail software defined network joins The Linux Foundation
    The Linux Foundation is far more than just Linux. It's also the home of many open-source networking projects such as the software-defined network (SDN) OpenDaylight, Open Platform for Network Function Virtualization (OPNFV), and Open Network Automation Program (ONAP). Now, networking power Juniper Networks has announced that OpenContrail, its open-source network virtualization cloud platform, will join the others as part of The Linux Foundation.
  • Juniper Moves OpenContrail to the Linux Foundation
    Juniper first released its Contrail products as open source in 2013 and built a community around the project. However, many stakeholders complained that Juniper didn’t work very hard to build the community, and some called it “faux-pen source.”
  • Juniper Moves SDN-Based OpenContrail Project to The Linux Foundation
    Juniper Networks today announced the codebase for OpenContrail, its open source network virtualization platform for the cloud, is moving to The Linux Foundation.
  • Bell Canada says open source ONAP adds modularity, flexibility to its network
    Bell Canada has become one of the first service providers to deploy Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP), focusing its initial attention on automating its data center tenant network provisioning process. By making this transition in its network, the service provider said it will provide its operations teams with a new tool to improve efficiency and time to market. This is the first step in using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s networks on its journey towards a multipartner DevOps model.
  • Bell Canada First to Deploy Open Source ONAP in Production
    Canadian communications provider Bell is the first organization to deploy an open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in a production environment. The milestone was noted in a blog post by Arpit Joshipura, general manager of networking and orchestration with the Linux Foundation.

Software: Everdo, GIMP, Notepadqq

  • Everdo – A Todo List and Getting Things Done App for Linux
    Everdo is a modern and beautifully-designed Electron-based task management application with which you can keep track of your work using tags, project folders, smart filters, and schedules. It doesn’t need a cloud account to work so your data will remain save on your PC. Everdo features a modern and minimalist User Interface with an extremely clean, clutter-less, and uniform design in order to enhance speedy and distraction-free productivity.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released with On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Better PSD Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released with on-canvas gradient editing, better handling of Adobe Photoshop PSD files, and support for those using GIMP on Wayland.
  • GIMP 2.9.8 Released With On-Canvas Gradient Editing, Wayland Support
    GIMP 2.9.8 has been released as the newest development version of this widely-used, open-source Photoshop-like program in its road to GIMP 2.10. Earlier this week I happened to highlight many of the changes building up for GIMP 2.9.8 as featured in A Lot Of Improvements Are Building Up For GIMP 2.9.8, Including Better Wayland Support.
  • Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor
    I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016.

Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor

I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016. Read more