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KDE Leftovers

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KDE
  • Gwenview Importer is back

    I spent some time over the last weeks to port Gwenview Importer to KDE Frameworks 5, as I was getting frustrated with importing pictures by hand. It's a straight port: no new features.

    Here is a screenshot after I filled my SD Card with random pictures of my daughter and cat for the purpose of illustrating this blog post Smile

  • Time to craft

    It's time for KDE Emerge to emerge as Craft.

    After many years of being the KDE Windows build tool we want to make KDE Emerge more visible and a tool for all developers.

    People associate Emerge with Gentoo, and they are right about it. This was a problem for many years now.

    For that reason Emerge will be called Craft from now on.

  • Functional reactive programming at Meeting C++

    There were couple of really nice talks – some less technical like the one from Jon Kalb of CppCon to the low level ones like the Rainer’s talk about the memory model of C++. Also, seing Bjarne Stroustrup in-person was a pleasure.

  • New Supernovae Data Source in KStars!

    The initial support for Supernovae in KStars was added back in 2011, but it relied on parsing an HTML page using a Python script to extract the necessary information on the latest discovered supernovae. It was obviously a very crude and hackish way to get the data, and I longed to rely on a better source for our data.

    The Harvard page we were relying on for supernovae updates suddenly stopped posting any further updates, its last update was made in 2015. Thankfully, we discovered a new gold trove of information: The Open Supernovae Catalog project!

  • Watching org.libelektra with Qt

    libelektra is a configuration library and tools set. It provides very many capabilities. Here I’d like to show how to observe data model changes from key/value manipulations outside of the actual application inside a user desktop. libelektra broadcasts changes as D-Bus messages. The Oyranos projects will use this method to sync the settings views of GUI’s, like qcmsevents, Synnefo and KDE’s KolorManager with libOyranos and it’s CLI tools in the next release.

  • Windows installer for Kate 16.08.3 KF5.28
  • Welcome new Kubuntu Members

    Friday November 18 was a productive day for the Kubuntu Community, as three new people were questioned and then elected into Membership. Welcome Simon Quigley, José Manuel Santamaría, and Walter Lapchynski as they package, work on our tooling, promote Kubuntu and help users.

  • Testing the untestable

    Admit it: how many times you have seen “software from this branch is completely untested, use it at your own risk” when you checked the latest code from any FOSS project? I bet you have, many times. For any reasonably modern project, this is not entirely true: Continuous Integration and automated testing are a huge help in ensuring that the code builds and at least does what it is supposed to do. KDE is no exception to this, thanks to build.kde.org and a growing number of unit tests.

  • From window killing to screenshot

    Last week I concentrated most of my development work on screenshot support through spectacle in a KWin Wayland session. Now I am happy to announce that we merged support for capturing a screenshot of a window with the help of an external application like spectacle.

    To explain why this is a great achievement we first need to look at X11. On X11 taking a screenshot of a window is easy. It’s part of the X protocol to read the pixmap data of the root window and you get the position and size of each window. Thus one is able to cut out the window and have it as a screenshot. That’s the most simple variant to do it, spectacle and previously ksnapshot do it differently. More on that later on.

  • New features in Ark 16.12

    Ark, the file archiver and compressor developed by KDE, has seen a lot of development for the upcoming 16.12 release. This blog post provides a summary of the most important changes.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla and Intel Funds for Kiwi TCMS and Blender

  • Kiwi TCMS: Kiwi TCMS is Open Source Seed Award winner

    Kiwi TCMS is the proud winner of a $10,000 award from Mozilla, Indeed, Open Collective, Ford Foundation & Simply Secure. Read below for the full story! At the end of January Zahari alerted our team about the Open Source Speed Dating FOSDEM 2020 event and Alex was very swift in filing the application form. Just as we landed in Brussels, ready to host Testing and Automation devroom and the Open Source Test Management stand, we got the news - Kiwi TCMS has been selected as a participant. What followed was a very hasty day of preparing a 5 min pitch and rehearsing it as much as possible so we can be ready to present our project. Alex prepared the pitch and made final review and polishing together with Anton. For the record everything was written down on paper, including important facts about the project and schedule - when and where is our slot, how is Alex going to get there, when does he need to leave to be on time, etc. We believe that preparation was key here and that's why our team always tries to be prepared when we participate at events! It was as good as it can get, no more changes!

  • Intel Ramping Up Their Investment In Blender Open-Source 3D Modeling Software

    Intel Software has increased their developer funding provided to Blender, the leading open-source, cross-platform 3D modeling software. Intel now joins the likes of Ubisoft, Tangent Labs, and others as being a Corporate Gold sponsor to Blender. The Corporate Gold level means Intel's software division is now contributing at least €30K per year to fund the Blender open-source development.

Security: The Keyring Concept in Ubuntu, Phishing and Malicious JavaScript

WordPress 5.4 RC5 and Load Balancing

  • WordPress 5.4 RC5

    The fifth release candidate for WordPress 5.4 is live! WordPress 5.4 is currently scheduled to land on March 31 2020, and we need your help to get there—if you haven’t tried 5.4 yet, now is the time! You can test the WordPress 5.4 release candidate in two ways:

  • Best Performance WordPress with Google Cloud CDN and Load Balancing

    Best Performance WordPress with Google Cloud CDN and Load Balancing. Learn how to setup your WordPress application to handle high traffic with auto-scaling capabilities on Google Cloud Platform using HTTP(S) Layer 7 Load Balancing. In this guide you will install WordPress, configure your website to use Google Cloud Storage for media files, setup instance template, auto-scaling group to manage live traffic. You will also configure Google Cloud CDN for your website.

Python Programming Leftovers