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New computer OS runs on your Web browser

Filed under
Misc

When it comes to personal computer operating systems or an ''OS,'' you can count them on one hand.

There's the Windows OS that you find on more personal computers than any other. Currently it's Windows XP, but there's a newer version coming out soon which will be called Windows Vista. Then there's Apple Computer's Macintosh OS called OS X. Currently it's version 10.4, or ''Tiger,'' but the newer 10.5 version known as ''Leopard'' should be here by the beginning of next year. The third big name in operating systems is Linux. And since it's open source, there are who knows how many version numbers and distributions floating around.

Recently there has been a movement to use the Internet to remotely handle some of the functions normally found on the computer itself. An example of this is backup. Off-site backup uses an Internet broadband connection to backup your computer's data to a remote location. The idea is that if there is a fire, robbery or some other local disaster that destroys your computer, the precious data you backed up isn't residing on some other media that happens to be in the same harm's way such as the drawer next to the computer or anywhere else nearby. That way, you are assured your data is safely and redundantly backed up on some remote server somewhere else. And while these remote services are becoming more and more common these days, I recently found a new remote OS. This is not an OS that resides on your computer. No, the OS resides on a remote server. The entire OS runs within an ordinary Web browser.

Full Story.

re: New Computer OS

They can call it whatever they want - but it's not an OS, it's a web app. If it doesn't BOOT my computer and act as an interface between my hardware and my app's then it's not an OS.

Citrix? Terminal Server?

Where I come from it's called Thin Client and it's been going for years.

You could even argue that this is what mainframes do!

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