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Sectoo--A Live Look at Gentoo

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Gentoo
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Live Linux CDs are popping up all over the place. Mainstream distributions like SimplyMEPIS let you try before you install, as does Ubuntu and Linspire. There are also specialized distributions like Knoppix and Dynebolic.

One Gentoo Linux-based distribution, called Sectoo, might also warrant a "live" look.

Anthony Rousseau, a native of France, created Sectoo so that penetration testers and consulting companies would have a toolbox designed to help them during their work.

"Another purpose may be for the network administrators who want to test their own network themselves and find security holes. White Hat Hackers can use it with the same purpose, and discover new vulnerabilities. And, anyone can take an old box, get the Sectoo Linux CD, and transform this box into an "out-of-the-box" intrusion detection system with Snort," Rousseau said. Check the list of network specific tools.

"I'm sure that other purposes can be found, let your imagination work!" he commented.

Rousseau wanted to make Sectoo Linux a lightweight system, in terms of minimal requirements. He said that 64MB or even 32MB of RAM should be enough to run Sectoo.

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