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Phishers Dodge Content Filtering

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Security

Phishing criminals are using a new technique to slip by the content filtering software some enterprises use to protect their workers from scams, a U.K.-based Web metrics and monitoring firm said Friday.

According to Netcraft, some fraudsters are replacing text content on their phony sites with similar-looking images, "making it much more difficult for automated systems to detect the presence of keywords such as 'PayPal' and 'credit card.'"

In an online alert, Netcraft illustrated how a phisher could simply embed text within an image to hide it from filters. The text would still be readable by a possible victim, but not by a computer.

"Because the content filters may not detect this [sample page] as being a PayPal phishing scam, it could slip through undetected, allowing the fraudster to harvest the credentials of thousands of PayPal customers," Netcraft went on in its alert.

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