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Avoiding quality assurance disasters with openQA

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OSS

OpenQA started in 2009 inside the openSUSE community and is now an integral part of the openSUSE ecosystem. It tests software the same way a human being does: Input is given by keyboard and mouse and results are recorded by comparing screenshots of the process to a set of predefined images. Just like a human tester, openQA detects failures and error messages by comparing what it sees with what it expects.

The first step is the package submission to a new operating system (OS) build. OpenQA runs through a basic pre-build package set to detect basic issues very early. After building a new version of the OS in the Open Build Service, this ISO will be automatically recognized by openQA and validated. The next step is extended "post-validation" testing.

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Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers

  • Running Rosetta@home on a Raspberry Pi with Fedora IoT

    The Rosetta@home project is a not-for-profit distributed computing project created by the Baker laboratory at the University of Washington. The project uses idle compute capacity from volunteer computers to study protein structure, which is used in research into diseases such as HIV, Malaria, Cancer, and Alzheimer’s. In common with many other scientific organizations, Rosetta@home is currently expending significant resources on the search for vaccines and treatments for COVID-19. Rosetta@home uses the open source BOINC platform to manage donated compute resources. BOINC was originally developed to support the SETI@home project searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. These days, it is used by a number of projects in many different scientific fields. A single BOINC client can contribute compute resources to many such projects, though not all projects support all architectures. For the example shown in this article a Raspberry Pi 3 Model B was used, which is one of the tested reference devices for Fedora IoT. This device, with only 1GB of RAM, is only just powerful enough to be able to make a meaningful contribution to Rosetta@home, and there’s certainly no way the Raspberry Pi can be used for anything else – such as running a desktop environment – at the same time.

  • Leading the way for Open Transformation in APAC

    "Transformation isn’t something that happens for only a focused period of time, and then there’s no change after that." - Anthony Watson, lead, Enterprise Domains, ANZ Bank The evolution and advancement of technologies grow to new heights every day, bringing unprecedented change in what individuals and corporations can create. To keep pace, organizations must continue to adopt, adapt, and advance their processes, but to acquire new technology is often not enough to bring a true change.

  • APAC Companies Prioritize Cultural Change and Technology Modernization to Accelerate Digital Transformation

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the results of a commissioned study by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services, on behalf of Red Hat, exploring Asia Pacific’s (APAC) transformation and innovation trajectory against a global backdrop. The study, titled "Understanding APAC’s Success in Digital Transformation," surveyed 143 business executives from APAC from various industries including financial services, IT and manufacturing sectors.

  • Introducing OpenShift cost management: A human-readable view into cloud-native application costs

    From dramatically increased telework demands to a surge in online services usage, IT teams are facing a new set of realities in managing their hybrid cloud environments. For IT decision-makers, this goes above and beyond just keeping infrastructure running and efficient; it’s about budget. Solving these new challenges often requires additional spending on infrastructure, something that IT teams simply may not have. This makes it critically important that IT teams can more quickly and easily see the totality of their IT costs across the hybrid cloud.

Games: Fragment's Moonrise, Steam, Overcooked! 2 and Tropico 6

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    With some promising ideas that could be great when further developed, Fragment's Moonrise is a new open-world real-time strategy game out now in Early Access. It's a little weird but the basic idea is pretty interesting. You control groups like you would in a traditional RTS, or perhaps more like a real-time tactics game and then upgrade like in an RPG. The genre blending here is what's interesting, while you explore a randomly generated world each time.

  • Boiling Steam Does Steam Summer Sale 2020

    There are certain constants of summer for the Boiling Steam staff: heat, humidity, and of course the Steam Summer Sale. After all, nothing says the changing of seasons like a new Steam sale. Below are a few quick thoughts on some games we’ve picked up, as well as others we’ve played recently that we can recommend while they are on sale (until July 9th, 10am Pacific). SteamDB, IsThereAnyDeal, or CheapShark can help you figure out if the sale price is the best you can get.

  • The 2020 Steam Summer Sale ends soon, here's some final picks

    Stuck for what to pick up? With the huge Steam Summer Sale ending tomorrow at 5PM UTC, here's a little helping hand for you on what's good. I get why you might be stuck, with well over six thousand games on Steam alone that support Linux, it's easy to get completely swallowed up in the vast sea of games. Especially true if you're looking to pick up a game on sale, as there's close to five thousand of those discounted!

  • Suns Out, Buns Out is another awesome Overcooked! 2 update

    Get your fire extinguishers ready and try not to set your kitchen ablaze in the latest free content update to the co-op cooking game Overcooked! 2 with Suns Out, Buns Out. One of the absolute best co-op games on any platform, Overcooked! 2 just keeps on giving. While the base game is good and they have some fun DLC expansions, it's always nice to see some extra free content for everyone. In the Suns Out, Buns Out update which is out now you get more kitchens to play through, more recipes and a whole lot of fun.

  • Tropico 6 gets a few new features plus a Linux release on GOG

    Want to take on the role of El Presidente? Well if you've been holding out for a Linux release on GOG we've got good news, plus it continues to be updated. Tropico 6 was released back in March 2019 going onto receiving some pretty good reviews overall and I certainly enjoyed it (and quite a bit more than Tropico 5 too). Sadly the GOG release had been missing a Linux build but it seemed to get quietly rolled out towards the end of last month!

Btrfs in Next Fedora

  • Btrfs by default, the compression option

    Hi, The change proposal has a 'compression option' and we kinda need to get organized. https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Changes/BtrfsByDefault#Compression - Compression saves space, significantly reduces write amplification and therefore increases flash lifespan, and in some cases increases performance. - Desired but not a requirement of the change proposal. 1. Goal: probably the goal performance wise is to perform as good or better than now. Is it OK if there's a write time performance hit for a small percent of folks, for a high value target like usr that isn't updated that often, and is also updated out of band (offline updates typically, but also isn't something directly related to the daily workload)? How to decide this? 2. Benchmarking: this is hard. A simple tool for doing comparisons among algorithms on a specific bit of hardware is lzbench. https://github.com/inikep/lzbench How to compile on F32. https://github.com/inikep/lzbench/issues/69 But is that adequate? How do we confirm/deny on a wide variety of hardware that this meets the goal? And how is this test going to account for parallelization, and read ahead? Do we need a lot of data or is it adequate to get a sample "around the edges" (e.g. slow cpu fast drive; fast cpu slow drive; fast cpu fast drive; slow cpu slow drive). What algorithm? 3. Improvements and upgrades. We'll do plan A, but learn new things later, and come up with plan B. How do we get the plan A folks upgraded to plan B? Or just don't worry? 4. The whole file system (using a mount option) or curated (using an XATTR set on specific "high value" directories)? This part is elaborated below. A. do this with a mount option '-o compress=zstd:1' - dilemma: it doesn't always lead to equal or better performance. On some systems and workloads, write performance is slightly reduced. What about LZO? B. do this with per directory XATTR - dilemma: the target directories don't exist at install time, depending on whether the installation is rsync, rpm, or unsquashfs based. C. do the install with '-o compres=zstd', then set XATTR post-install - dilemma: the installed files won't have XATTR set, only new files inherit; does a 'dnf update' overwrite files and therefore the XATTR is not inherited, or are they new files and do inherit the XATTR? D. Which directories? Some may be outside of the installer's scope. /usr /var/lib/flatpak ~/.local/share/flatpak /var/lib/containers/ ~/.local/share/containers/ ~/.var ~/.cache (Plausible this list should be reversed. While compressing ~/.cache may not save much space, it's likely hammered with more changes than other locations, hence more benefit in terms of reducing write amplification.) For reference, the above is mostly from the description in the RFE bug attached to the feature's tracker bug. But I think it's best to have most discussion here and leave the bug for implementing+testing the implementation details. https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1851276 Thanks, -- Chris Murphy

  • Fedora Developers Evaluating Compression Options For Btrfs-By-Default Proposal

    The proposal for using Btrfs by default on the Fedora desktop is gaining a fair amount of traction and interest from the community and could possibly move ahead but further testing and decisions are still to be made. First of all, today marks a Fedora Btrfs test day for those wanting to help in evaluating this change proposal. Check it out if you have spare system(s) and interested in helping make the decision whether Fedora desktop spins should transition from EXT4 to Btrfs by default.

  • Btrfs to be the Default Filesystem on Fedora? Fedora 33 Starts Testing Btrfs Switch

    While we’re months away from Fedora’s next stable release (Fedora 33), there are a few changes worth keeping tabs on. Among all the other accepted system-wide changes for Fedora 33, the proposal of having Btrfs as the default filesystem for desktop variants is the most interesting one.

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