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“SUSE Linux”

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Farnham, UK–Perhaps due to the participation of Novell, SUSE Linux is one of the most popular and highly rated Linux distributions available today. Indeed, Novell claims over seven thousand installations a day, a breathtaking average of one every twelve seconds. With SUSE’s quick and easy installation, excellent hardware detection to get it all going, and first class implementations of both KDE and Gnome, it’s no wonder.

Chris Brown, author of “SUSE Linux: A Complete Guide To Novell’s Community Distribution” (O’Reilly) is optimistic about Linux in general and SUSE in particular, “Three years ago, you couldn’t write a credible sentence containing the words ‘Linux’, ‘Enterprise,’ and ‘Desktop’. Now you can. Internally, Novell has moved over entirely to a Linux desktop. Not just the technical people, but the office managers, HR folks, finance guys, everyone.

“Novell has also recently released SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 (called SLED 10), which has attracted quite a bit of attention,” Brown continues. “The quality of the KDE and Gnome desktops has improved enormously. OpenOffice is a viable alternative to Microsoft Office. It’s all there. With tools like Beagle, and the sexy, organic XGL/Compiz window manager, the Linux desktop is poised for head-to-head combat with Windows Vista.”

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