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Rumors of OpenOffice Demise Exaggerated

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OOo

LibreOffice spun out from OpenOffice in the aftermath of the Oracle/Sun acquisition. It was one of many projects including Hudson/Jenkins and MySQL/MariaDB that got forked. To the best my knowledge while all those forks have strong user bases and have become the default tools in their respective domains - the original projects persist.

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More in Tux Machines

Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox Leftovers

  • Chrome 74 beta: reducing unwanted motion, private class fields, and feature policy API
    Unless otherwise noted, changes described below apply to the newest Chrome Beta channel release for Android, Android WebView, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, and Windows. View a complete list of the features in Chrome 74 on ChromeStatus.com. Chrome 74 is beta as of March 22, 2019.
  • Chrome 74 Beta Released With CSS Media Query To Prefer Reduced Motion/Animations
    Google engineers are ending out their work week by issuing the beta of Chrome 74.  The Chrome 74 Beta features the CSS "prefers-reduced-motion" media query for honoring accessibility settings for those that may want to reduce/eliminate animations or other motions. Also on the developer side is ECMAScript private class fields, a JavaScript API for feature policy, CSS transition events, WebRTC additions, and other changes.
  • Mike Conley: Firefox Front-End Performance Update #15
    Firefox 66 has been released, Firefox 67 is out on the beta channel, and Firefox 68 is cooking for the folks on the Nightly channel! These trains don’t stop! With that, let’s take a quick peek at what the Firefox Front-end Performance team has been doing these past few weeks…
  • SUMO A/B Experiments
    This year the SUMO team is focused on learning what to improve on our site. As part of that, we spent January setting support.mozilla.org up for A/B testing and last week we ran our first test!
  • Get the tablet experience you deserve with Firefox for iPad
    We know that iPads aren’t just bigger versions of iPhones. You use them differently, you need them for different things. So rather than just make a bigger version of our browser for iOS, we made Firefox for iPad look and feel like it was custom made for a tablet. Mostly because it was.

Programming: Sublime Text Editor, RcppArmadillo, Django, Python and C

  • Sublime Text Editor For Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    Programmers/Developers always love rich-feature text editor, they can be more productive using such application. Sublime Text Editor has been around since 2008 and widely used by many programmers. It is written using C++ and Python programming language, the best thing about this editor is that it's cross-platform and available for Linux, Mac and Windows. Sublime-Text editor natively support numerous amount of programming and markup languages, more functionality can be added using plugins, the plugins are mostly built by its community and maintained user free-software licenses.
  • RcppArmadillo 0.9.300.2.0
    A new RcppArmadillo release based on a new Armadillo upstream release arrived on CRAN and Debian today. Armadillo is a powerful and expressive C++ template library for linear algebra aiming towards a good balance between speed and ease of use with a syntax deliberately close to a Matlab. RcppArmadillo integrates this library with the R environment and language–and is widely used by (currently) 583 other packages on CRAN.
  • William Lachance: New ideas, old buildings
    Last week, Brendan Colloran announced Iodide, a new take on scientific collaboration and reporting that I’ve been really happy to contribute to over the past year-and-a-bit. I’ve been describing it to people I meet as kind of "glitch meets jupyter " but that doesn’t quite do it justice. I’d recommend reading Brendan’s blog post (and taking a look at our demonstration site) to get the full picture. One question that I’ve heard asked (including on Brendan’s post) is why we chose a rather conventional and old technology (Django) for the server backend. Certainly, Iodide has not been shy about building with relatively new or experimental technologies for other parts (e.g. Python on WebAssembly for the notebooks, React/Redux for the frontend). Why not complete the cycle by using a new-fangled JavaScript web server like, I don’t know, NestJS? And while we’re at it, what’s with iodide’s ridiculous REST API? Don’t you know GraphQL is the only legitimate way to expose your backend to the world in 2019? The great urban theorist of the twentieth century, Jane Jacobs has a quote I love:
  • Setup your Raspberry Pi Model B as Google Colab (Feb '19) to work with Tensorflow, Keras and OpenCV
  • Getting started with the updated VS Code Yeoman extension for Camel projects
  • Plot the Aroon Up and the Aroon Down lines with Python
  • Linux C Programming Tutorial Part 15 - 2's Complement and Negative numbers
  • Using multiprocessing - a simple introduction.

From Trusty to Bionic - my Ultrabook story

I am happy with how the upgrade went, given that I've actually bumped the system two major releases. Apart from small issues, there was nothing cardinal in the move. No data loss, no complications, no crashes. All my stuff remains intact, and so does Windows 8, living happily together and sharing the disk with Ubuntu. Mission accomplished. But we ain't done. I need to make the system as usable as possible. Which means Unity testing - and Plasma testing, of course, duh! Indeed, this remains a productivity box, and as such, it must fulfill some very stringent requirements. It must be stable, fast and elegant. It must work with me every step of the way, and it must allow me to transparently and seamlessly use various programs that I need. On this particular machine, that would be video editing with Kdenlive, that would be image processing with GIMP, the use of encryption and VPN tools, tons of writing on the superbly ergonomic Asus keyboard. But all that and more - coming soon. For now, thank you Trusty for five sweet, loyal years. May you ReST in ethernet peace. Read more

Software: Avidemux, Cockpit and NVMe VFIO in Linux

  • Avidemux 2.7.3 Released with Various Decoder Fixes (Ubuntu PPA)
    Avidemux video editor released a new bug-fix version just 11 days after the last, with decoder fixes and misc small improvements
  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 190
    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 190.
  • NVMe VFIO Mediated Device Support Being Hacked On For Lower Latency Storage In VMs
    Maxim Levitsky of Red Hat sent out a "request for comments" patch series this week introducing NVMe VFIO media storage device support for the Linux kernel. Levitsky is pursuing faster virtualization of storage while striving for low latency and that led to the creation of a VFIO-based mediated device driver to pass an NVMe partition or namespace to a guest. This NVMe VFIO mediated device support would allow virtualized guests to run their unmodified/standard NVMe device drivers, including the Windows drivers, while still allowing the NVMe device to be shared between the host and guest.