Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Trojan horse hacker jailed in US

Filed under
Security

A US hacker has been jailed for 12 months for using a Trojan horse virus to break into US Department of Defense computers.

The Indiana man, 21, was part of an international gang of hackers known as "Thr34t-Krew" (TK).

The Troj/TKBot-A Trojan horse (also known as the TKWorm) exploited a vulnerability that is found on some Microsoft IIS Web servers.

At least two computers belonging to the Department of Defense were infected and damaged by the malicious code.

Between October 2002 and 7 March 2003, the jailed man and others were able to remotely control infected computers without the knowledge of the computers' owners. Other computers around the world were infected.

"There is a growing trend for hacking gangs to break into innocent people's computers to spy, to steal, and to cause damage," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at security software company Sophos.

"This sentence sends out a strong message to other hackers that infecting others with Trojan horses and other malware is not acceptable," he said.

The jailed man, who pleaded guilty to the charges, has been ordered to pay $12,000 (£6,500) to the Department of Defense for damage caused by the Trojan horse.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers (Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium”, Regulation)

  • Parrot Security OS 3.0 “Lithium” — Best Kali Linux Alternative Coming With New Features
    The Release Candidate of Parrot Security OS 3.0 ‘Lithium’ is now available for download. The much-anticipated final release will come in six different editions with the addition of Libre, LXDE, and Studio editions. The version 3.0 of this Kali Linux alternative is based on Debian Jessie and powered by custom hardened Linux 4.5 kernel.
  • Regulation can fix security, except you can't regulate security
    Every time I start a discussion about how we can solve some of our security problems it seems like the topics of professional organizations and regulation are where things end up. I think regulations and professional organizations can fix a lot of problems in an industry, I'm not sure they work for security. First let's talk about why regulation usually works, then, why it won't work for security.

Phoronix on Graphics

AMD's gaming-optimized AMDGPU-PRO driver for Linux is in beta

AMD has been working on a new Linux graphics driver stack, and it’s finally becoming usable. You can install the gaming-optimized AMDGPU-PRO driver on Ubuntu 16.04 today, and Valve just added it to the latest beta version of SteamOS. Read more