Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Taking Fedora Core 6 Test 2 for a Live-Spin

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

The FedoraUnity.org community group released a selection of "Live-Spins" of Fedora Core 5 and 6 recently and since I still have trouble with Anaconda liking my harddrive, I hoped I'd get to test a Fedora in the livecd format. I was fortunate and was able to get my first look at Fedora in quite a while. The isos are offered for Fedora Core 5 and Fedora Core 6 Test 2 in both cd and dvd for i386 and x86_64. I downloaded the 1.4 gig 386 DVD version.

The live cd boots to a lovely splash screen with the basic directions of pressing Enter to boot or using the function keys. F2 gives you a few options like single or multi-processor, memtest, or debug. F3 gives some general information and F4 offers the License. At this point I just hit Enter and a verbose text boot took me to a configuration wizard. First asked to agree to the License, the user is then taken through some basic configuration steps such as Firewall, SELinux, Date/Time, Users, and a Sound test. Afterwhich one is taken to the login screen.

        

The Readme that accompanies the iso states that there are a root and Fedora user, and their passwords are kadischi. Since the configuration wizard includes setting up a user, the Fedora user will probably not be used, but it was nice knowing the root password. I logged in using the user account I set up and was taken to a Gnome 2.15.4 desktop featuring this tasteful wallpaper of primarily green with an image of a dew drop about to fall from a leaf. Reflected in the droplet is the famous Fedora lowercase f. The theme is a lovely offering called Clearlooks. Other than that and some customized icons, the rest of Gnome seemed fairly standard issue. The menus were typical as well. The default desktop for me at first login was 800x600, but I was able to easily adjust that to 1280x1024. Performance was almost acceptable and the fonts were lovely under Gnome using the default vesa graphic drivers.

        

My two sound chips were detected during the boot configuration, and I tested and affirmed my sound blaster. Upon first login a printer wizard appeared, autodetecting and offering the correct drivers for my Epson R200 printer. My scanner was auto-configured and was instantly available to Xsane. My old Logitech usb webcam wasn't so lucky. The voip application (Ekiga) didn't see it at all and instead tried to use my bttv card. My bttv card is never properly setup by any Linux, but it was moot this time since no app was available in the menu for it. All in all, I'd say hardware detection was about par for the course for me, or perhaps a stroke better.

KDE 3.5.4 is also available on the live dvd system. It seemed to use the Red Hat theme of Blue Curve with the same wallpaper and similar icons as found in Gnome. However the default fonts and performance of the KDE desktop were painfully ugly and slow under the vesa drivers, but a switch to 'nv' cured both. The X server in Live-Spin is Xorg version 7.1.1, and now after 4 distros exhibiting the same symptoms I'm fairly sure there is something up with Xorg 7.1.1, vesa, and nvidia 6800 chips.

        

In both the Gnome and KDE menus we find plenty of applications for our daily tasks. OpenOffice.org 2.0.3 is the featured office suite. Firefox and Thunderbird 1.5.0.5 are the default browser and email clients. Gaim and Kopete are offered for instant messaging, and Ksirc as well as Xchat are available for irc.

        

There are a lot of developmental applications in the menu. I had trouble with Eclipse not starting here, instead shooting an ugly error. There are plenty of configuration and preference settings as well as utilities and system tools. One (or two) of the most notable are the Package Manager and Package Updater. These appear to be front-ends to yum. The Package Manager adds and removes applications while the Package Updater checks mirrors for updates. The Package manager didn't seem to work too well here, giving me an(other) ugly error instead of installing software, but the updater seemed to work rather well. Besides this entry in the menu called AutoRun that wouldn't open, these were the only problems encountered with apps.

        

        

Well, I say those were the only problems encountered with applications, but I guess that depends on your perspective. In the multimedia menu we find apps for burning cds, ripping audio cds, listening to music files, and playing video. All seemed to function well enough, except the movie players couldn't play any movie files. It appears they require codecs and plugins, but as default they didn't work at all.

        

Also included are some games for your enjoyment such as Blackjack, Mines, SameGnome, Tali, Nibbles, Mahjongg, and more. For image viewing and manipulation we find The Gimp, gThumb, Xsane, amongst others. In most of these categories we find several KDE apps as well as those listed.

        

Overall it was a pleasant experience testing driving Fedora Core Live-Spin. The system as a whole seemed to function fairly well, especially considering we were testing a developmental snapshot and not the stable release. The Kadischi live cd generator and boot system seems to be functioning pretty good these days as well, or at least from the clueless end-user standpoint. Performance was still a tad sluggish even after using nv. I was testing the i386 version and suspect the x86_64 version would have been snappier. Otherwise it was quite the treat running Fedora Core and hope someday to be able to install it.


More in Tux Machines

Red Hat and Fedora

today's howtos

Leftovers: KDE

  • CentOS 6.8 image with Qt5.7, Python 3.5, LLVM 3.8
    While trying to bring my setup to package KDevelop standalone for Linux into a shape where it has a nonzero probability of me picking it up again in half a year and actually understanding how to use it, I created a docker base image which I think might be useful to other people trying to package Linux software as well. It is based on CentOS 6.8 and includes Qt 5.7 (including QtWebKit), Python 3.5 and LLVM, all built against the old CentOS libs (and thus e.g. compatible with most glibc versions out there). If you want to use it, simply install docker, and
  • Marble Maps in KDE Randa Meetings 2016
    One more year of fun and intense productivity in Randa came to an end just a few days back, and I feel so good to have been a part of it. Much progress was made by the Marble team this year by Dennis, Torsten, Friedrich, David and me. I mostly worked on the Marble Maps Android app’s navigation feature, and would like to mention the changes here very briefly...
  • KStars on Windows – Midterm evaluation
    Midterm evaluation has passed and now it’s time for a new blog post! There are a couple of weeks from the last time I’ve talked about my progress with my Google Summer of Code project.
  • Kaffeine 2.0.4 Released, Includes Major Improvements for Digital TV
    Kaffeine version 2.0.4 has been released today, substantially improving its already excellent Digital TV (DTV) support!
  • GSoC -Breath and Review
    A couple weeks ago I went to Randa Meetings, a sprint of KDE, and there I did a lot of work in Umbrello.
  • Plasma 5.6.5 and Frameworks 5.23 available in Kubuntu 16.04 Backports
  • Remote searching [KRunner/Blade]
  • Kubuntu Dojo 2 – Kubuntu Ninjas
  • Kubuntu Podcast goes Open and Unplugged
    Podcast fans will know that we were struck down with lucky show thirteen. Google Hangouts crashed out twice, and we lost the live stream. We ended up half an hour late, with no Hangouts, and a hastily make-shift YouTube live stream hooked together in record time by the #awesome Ovidiu-florin Bogdan.
  • Hacking Kdenlive at Randa
    The Randa meetings 2016 just ended, and they were a big success for everyone involved (thanks to Mario and his team for organizing this). We went there with an aim to work on Kdenlive's Windows port, and we managed to achieve more than 80% of the build process.
  • The Road of Trials
    In my last blog post I said that I would work on extending support for paint operations like 'fill'. I have done so, albeit more as a necessity in fixing the assistant code. Moreover, I have fixed a number of other paint operations which are vital in painting the various assistants Krita offers currently.
  • Randa Meetings 2016 Part II: Marble
    The Randa Meetings 2016 were centered on bringing KDE technology on every device.
  • System Settings review
    we have also a design for some single KCM’s 80%. In plasma 5.7 you will see the new Desktop Theme module, but we also have some mockups for other KCM’s here you see the appearance KCM’s
  • State of the KF5 Android CI
    I would have liked to say, “Yeah the Android CI runs!” – But we are not there yet; pretty close actually, and close enough that it already makes sense to tell about it, yet a few last Jenkins settings remain to be done and real life issues cause this to take a few more days. So, I will give a short primer on what we prepared in Randa.
  • Mid-term post.
    My midterm evaluation target was to create a static histogram in Labplot with an option to add new histogram among the given types and set visible advanced settings.

Leftovers: Software

  • Calamares 2.3 out now
    I’ve just released Calamares 2.3, a feature release with a major focus on disk encryption support (see full release announcement). Calamares is a distribution-agnostic system installer, with an advanced partitioning feature and support for third party branding and modules. It is used by several distributions, including Netrunner, Manjaro, Tanglu, OpenMandriva, KaOS, Chakra and many others.
  • QBittorrent 3.3.5 Released – Install on Debian/Ubuntu/Linux Mint and Fedora
    qBittorent is a Bittorent client which is developed to provide free software alternative of utorrent. It’s a Cross platform torrent client which provides the same features on all the major platforms like Linux, Ubuntu, Mac OS X and Windows.
  • 7 Best File Comparison and Difference (Diff) Tools for Linux
    While writing program files or normal text files, programmers and writers sometimes want to know the difference between two files or two versions of the same file. When you compare two computer files on Linux, the difference between their contents is called a diff. This description was born out of a reference to the output of diff, the well known Unix command-line file comparison utility.
  • 14 Best IDEs for C++ Programming or Source Code Editors on Linux
    C++, an extension of well known C language, is an excellent, powerful and general purpose programming language that offers modern and generic programming features for developing large-scale applications ranging from video games, search engines, other computer software to operating systems.
  • Calibre 2.61.0 eBook Viewer and Converter Updates Driver for FNAC (BQ) eReaders
    Today, July 1, 2016, Calibre developer Kovid Goyal has been happy to announce the general availability of yet another maintenance release for his popular, open-source and cross-platform Calibre ebook library management software. Coming only one week after the debut of Calibre 2.60, the Calibre 2.61 maintenance update brings only two new features. These are an updated driver with new firmware to allow users to connect their FNAC (BQ) eReader devices, as well as support for automatic removal of all links from a missing resource (the option is available in the Check Book component under Edit Book).