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IBM Pledges $100 Million for Linux

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Linux

IBM announced today that it will spend $100 million over the next several years developing linux applications for it's enterprize desktop offerings. vnunet is quoted as saying, "According to Big Blue, its expanded Linux support will help customers build Linux-based enterprise infrastructures. It aims to enable products and applications to run on a variety of operating systems, including Linux."

"Since customers have been looking for ways to extend the value of Linux to the desktop, IBM felt the time was right to deliver a fully supported Linux client alternative," said Ambuj Goyal, general manager of workplace, portal and collaboration software at IBM. IBM is helping customers to more fully utilise the business benefits of the Linux platform by providing software on Linux to help build the front end of their solutions."

Piece of the pie

Hey IBM, how about passing us a little piece of that pie! LOLOL

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