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Life with Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

A week ago or so I decided to ditch windowx xp on my machine. I would install one of the many popular Linux distributions floating around on the net and mentioned in distrowatch, a site I always visited for the fun of it.

Anyway, windows saw the last of me some time ago, and I decided to install the Zenwalk linux distribution, which is based on Slackware linux, but I had some problems with it, regarding it's hardware detection (sound), and its bootloader (lilo). The thing is that Zenwalk made things harder for me, because when it installs lilo, it gets stuck on your hard drive's mbr, and won't go away, so I had to boot up with a windows 98 (gasp!) boot diskette to erase the mbr, which is my rather primitive way of doing it.

Anyway, after wiping clean my mbr I installed ubuntu, the 6.06 LTS release. I was planning on using the xfs filesystem, as its very efficient and has support for über large files, but a bug in the installer, related to grub I guess, prevented me from using that filesytem. Anyway, after settling on reiserfs all went smoothly.

Full Story.

Big whoop

Yawn.....Another fluff piece by another fluff blogger. Pathetic articles like this cause Linux more grief then good. At this point in the product cycle, why does anyone care that some dweeb moved to Linux. It shouldn't be such a surprising act (wait a minute - it's NOT).

re: Big whoop

Dang, can't blame that one on anonymous either. Big Grin

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

lolol

I think alot of these pieces like this are coming from the Ubuntu marketing dept using Ubuntu advocates.

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