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Linux and Asterisk Aid Paris Hilton Voice-mail Hacking

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Misc

The feud between celebrities Paris Hilton and Lindsay Lohan has taken a turn for the geeky, with a small fake Caller ID seller accusing Hilton of hacking into voicemail accounts on an un-named mobile phone network.

Hilton was one of more than 50 customers whose accounts were suspended because they had been using SpoofCard.com's Caller ID spoofing service to hack into voicemail accounts, according to Mark Del Bianco, SpoofCard.com's attorney. Many of the accounts that were hacked via the spoofing service belonged to well-known celebrities, including Lohan, he said.

SpoofCard.com has not actually accused Hilton of hacking into Lohan's voicemail. But celebrity gossip sheets, already abuzz with the rivalry between the two divas, have jumped on the story.

And with less than 10 employees, SpoofCard.com was able to use Asterisk and Linux to create a line of business that would have been far too expensive just ten years ago. The fake Caller ID vendor sells US$10, 60-minute calling cards that let users call a toll-free number and type in whatever Caller ID number they want their call to display.

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