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This Week at the Movies: Hitch & The Aviator

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Martin Scorsese's The Aviator turned out to be an insightful look into passions and madness of millionaire and self-proclaimed aviator Howard Hughes. The movie starts...

off slow and takes an hour to actually seem more than strung together scenes, but once it begans to mold into a complex character study the audience finds itself involved. The first rate cast is of course excellent and convincing while the script and direction is slightly formulatic, but none the less interesting or engaging. The character development from Leonardo DiCaprio is surprisingly believable after a slow start. The portrayal of Hughes' decent into madness was almost Oscar worthy. The character was multi-dimensional and drew in the audience to actually care about and feel for him. His co-stars include Cate Blanchett portraying Katherine Hepburn, Kate Beckinsale portraying Ava Gardner, Alan Alda as Senator Brewster, and Alec Baldwin as Juan Tripp. Each of these accomplished actors pull their characters off marvelously, with honorable mention to Cate Blanchett. I think this is the best Hepburn portrayal I've seen to date. None the less impressive are the shots of the plane crash that nearly cost Hughes his life and the only flight of "The Spruce Goose". This is a good film and worth a look-see.


Hitch was this Valentine's surprise hit starring Will Smith and Eva Mendes. I found the romantic comedy quite humorous and entertaining. Meant to be light and enjoyable it misses the mark slightly by actually developing some depth for it main characters. Will Smith is his usual charming witty self, I mean, who doesn't like Will Smith? The script was cute and had all the required parts, introduction, build-up, problem, resolution and finally happy ending. It was enjoyable, but I only really laughed out loud at the very end during the wedding reception scene when our hero and friends take to the dance floor. It's a good take-your-girlfriend-to-see flick and well worth the price of admission.

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