Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Open source news not as good as it sounds

Filed under
OSS

Setting aside for a moment the debate going on in enterprises over whether to use Microsoft or open source alternatives, this week has seen much noise over two other battlegrounds: schools and local government.

It all started with word that a forthcoming report from the British Educational Communications and Technology Association (BECTA) will claim primary schools can halve IT costs if they go open source.

Microsoft quickly responded, saying it would not back down from a fight in the education market. It trotted out the old 'competition is good for customers' justification.

For local authorities, the news is that almost two-thirds are looking to increase their use of open source software because of cost and dissatisfaction with Microsoft, according to research from local government IT user group Socitm and the Financial Times.

Both developments look promising for the open source contingent but demand closer examination.

Microsoft said it won't cede the education market and should be taken seriously. Remember what it did to Apple, once the dominant computer supplier for schools? Now Windows on a Dell machine is the more likely tool in the classroom.

Even more so, both of these pieces of research base their case for open source on the fact it could save money for schools and local authorities. But cost is only one of the issues. Schools and councils also need a certain amount of know-how to switch to open source - both for the practical implementation and in even knowing it's an option - a point silicon.com columnist Simon Moores brought up in an article today.

This is where education and local government start to look a lot like corporations. Ease-of-use, familiarity and the hassle of any migration must be weighed alongside cost and lock-in, no matter which market segment you're looking at - and perhaps even more so for those traditionally lacking the resources and technical know-how of the private sector.

Source.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Gaming

Fedora: The Latest

Leftovers: KDE

  • ocs-client GSoC
    So my GSoC is coming to its end. I have no cool screenshots to upload this time and I have no new great features to talk about, in fact Caludio and I manly focused on bugfixing and testing. We have spent time also discussing about possible changes and improvements to the current OCS protocol. So is the client ready do be lunched? In short I would say that no, not yet.. although most of its features are implemented and it is usable, it is still an “under construction” project, we both still have to make some important decisions to make it usable to everyone.
  • The Fiber Engine Poll, Updates, and Breeze
  • Bringing Akonadi Next up to speed
    and refactoring it again, to make sure the codebase remains as clean as possible. The result of that is that an implementation of a simple resource only takes a couple of template instantiations, apart from code that interacts with the datasource (e.g. your IMAP Server) which I obviously can’t do for the resource.
  • New linter integration plugins for KDevelop
  • Artikulate Plans for Randa
    Language learning is often considered as the task of memorizing new vocabulary and understanding the new grammar rules. Yet for most, the most challenging part is to actually get used to speak the new language. This is a problem that Artikulate approaches with a simple idea: to learn the correct pronunciation of a word or even a longer phrase, the learner listens to a native speaker recording, repeats and recordings it, and finally compares both recordings to improve herself/himself with the next try.

Tails 1.5.1 is out

Tails, The Amnesic Incognito Live System, version 1.5.1, is out. This is an emergency release, triggered by an unscheduled Firefox release meant to fix critical security issues. Read more