Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Elive 0.5 Beta-3.1

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

As announced on Distrowatch, "The new generation of Elive has started and the beta-3.1 for the future version 0.5 is officially released. Version 0.5 is based on Dsslive with kernel 2.6.15 and X.Org 7.0. Other new features include SATA support, better compatibility with amd64 processors, new drivers for wireless networking, and several improvements to the hard disk installer. Enlightenment 17 now comes with a beautiful Lucax theme, while Firefox also has an exciting, never-seen-before look." It was time for Tuxmachines to take another look.

The first thing mentioned in the changelog was the change to the DSSLive from the previous Morphix base, but we are left wanting for a real reason. What was the advantage? To DSS experienced, it might be obvious. For me, I had to check. Turns out that, according to the DSS website, "DSS (Debased Scripts Set) project is dedicated to providing you with a "System Development Environment" to create your own DEbian BASED Live Linux System." In fact, it's further explained,

Normally you're stuck with the type and amount of applications the creator decided to include, now you can customize the system to fit your needs, by generating on-the-fly compressed modules (layers) including additional software .

The idea is to not "debase" the Default Debian System, and for this purpose the USS (The Upstream Salmon Struct) has been designed.

In this way you'll have a HW autodetection and autoconfiguration flavor without affecting the standard system.

DSS can be used to:

  • create your own live distribution

  • put together a demo disk to show off the power of our favourite OS
  • build a portable system to install on external USB/FIREWIRE HD and boot it up.
  • backup your system and run it from a CD/DVD

Ok, I'm sold. I'll take one!

        

But what about the new look spoke of? I booted the Elive livecd and logged in as instructed. Where it once defaulted to E17, it now defaults to E16. They've updated the look of E16 to so closely resemble their E17 theme, that I have to admit I wondered where was the twinkly wallpaper and the floating orb? I later discovered where they were. Right where they always were -> in E17. Blushing

    

Interesting tidbits found in the changlog are:

  • e17 Lucax theme a very nice and eyecandy theme for e17 made by Duvelr, used for the Night look of Elive

  • Very nice look for firefox, you don't have seen a browser with a similar style in all your life Wink

Whoosh! That Lucax theme is sleek, dark, and sexy! I don't understand why the developers set their old elive theme with E16 as default. They should set their best looking and lastest greatest as default in my opinion. E17 with Lucax looks killer. The wallpaper is a medium to dark blue with darker blue abstract depressions as designs. This is an animated wallpaper as well, with white twinkles. Too bad I wasn't able to catch them in a screenshot. The menu is dark as well with wonderful looking effects. The gray menu text shows highlighted with greenish-blue text in a bubble-effect. The windec has a wonderful 3D rounded look with dark bluish purple button indicators. In this theme the icons in the panel throb with a mouse over, again unfortunately not captured in screenshots. The cursor is wedge-shaped and in a matching bluish purple. The overall look and feel of this theme just really impresses and excites. YUM! I love it! :up:

        

As far as their statement that it is used for Night look, I didn't see it. The Night theme changed the menus and windec to a darker color and the widgets were a bit different, but nothing that could compare to Lucax. Their statement about Firefox seems exaggerated to me as well. Seems like I've seen the theme used for it at the Firefox theme site - or one very similar. If original work, it surely reminds me of one I'd seen to achieve a MacOS look. Firefox looks great in Elive, but I'm not sure it's "don't have seen a browser with a similar style in all [my] life."

    

The changelog also states of the their kernel:

  • Drivers, Kernel and Modules:

    • Kernel 2.6.15 Debian based

    • SATA Suported from the kernel
    • Better Amd64 Machines Compatibility
    • A lot of Wireless and misc drivers added
    • Better Amd64 Machines Compatibility

But one of the new features I noticed soon enough was the new upgrade feature of the installer. I clicked on the hard drive installer icon in the panel and a window opened up informing me of its intention to check my system. I'm not sure what it was actually checking, but it soon came back stating it found an older version of Elive, 0.4 to be exact, and suggested I just upgrade that. Seemed I wasn't given much choice in the matter actually, as clicking ok sent it on its way. I wasn't really given a chance to do a fresh install. I figured that's okay at this point as I'd love to test this new feature and report on it's functionality. I wouldn't say the upgrade process was a 100% success. E16 retained much of the original theme configurations while losing the wallpaper altogether. E17 lost most of the menu items. But it did boot (with new kernel) and function. Apps seemed updated to newer versions, and opened and worked fine. So for "experimental" software, it was a bit impressive. It did better than some big-named distros with years and years of development.

As far as application offerings, I think they are pretty much as previously found in earlier version of Elive, albeit updated version. They all opened and appeared to do their thing as far as I tested, except for Streamtuner - which shot a crash error and exited, and their keyboard shortcut tutorial - which didn't respond properly to the keyboard shortcuts it instructed me to use. The cdplayers worked wonderfully, and mplayer played the commonly downloaded video formats without any complaints. New this release we find Thunar and Bonfire. And as previously found, the wonderful control panel seems to be a bit improved. I love this control panel. It's the most original and fun control panel I've ever encountered. I'm looking forward to it being perfected. Also new on the desktop is a news feed applet set to pull in Elive news. Clicking on a headline opens Firefox to the corresponding article.

        

The Xorg version found was 7.0 and the Elive livecd asks the nvidia user if they'd like to use NVIDIA proprietary drivers, nv, or vesa. I chose NVIDIA and the resolution I preferred, then never had to give X another thought.

Hardware detection was really good. My printer and scanner were detected and operable upon boot as well as all the other common hardware, including my bit more obscure ethernet chipset for which some distros neglect to add support.

The system performed excellently. Most apps opened right up instantaneously. Even OpenOffice and Firefox seemed much quicker on Elive than normally experienced with other distros. Menus snapped opened without delay and window movement was smooth and slick. In addition, the system was quite stable in my testing. The only problem was streamtuner as mentioned earlier.

Overall I continue to be amazed at this offering. Many developers include E! with their distros, but this is the only project to embrace it as default and put in so much effort to customize and beautify it. It's just a really neato package! Elive remains one of Tuxmachines' favorite projects.

Elive Homepage.
Full 0.5 Beta 3.1 Changelog.
More Screenshots.

Previous Coverage:

The Sentinel

Like the screenshot of M Player obvious cam version of the sentinel definitely not an open source film me thinks.

re: The Sentinel

It was a sample or a clip.

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • Vivaldi 3.2 Brings a Mute Button on Picture-in-Picture Mode, More Improvements

    Vivaldi Technologies announced today the general availability of the Vivaldi 3.2 web browser for all supported platforms, an update that brings various improvements and new features. Vivaldi 3.2 comes about two months after Vivaldi 3.1 and introduces a mute button to the Picture-in-Picture implementation called Pop-out Video. This lets users better control the floating windows when watch clips by muting or unmuting the sound of the video. Vivaldi devs say that the new mute button on the Pop-out video window is a welcome addition when you work from home and you have to quickly jump into an online meeting or take a phone call as you can now immediately mute the clip without having to close the window. You can see the new mute button in action below. Of course, you can also mute the entire tab by right clicking on the tab where the video plays and selecting the “Mute Tab” context menu item or by using the quick commands, but it’s faster with the new mute button on the Pop-out video.

  • Windows 10 Devices Are at Risk From the BootHole Vulnerability

    Unfortunately, because this flaw is related to Windows’ boot sequence, it’s not something that you can fix yourself. Microsoft has to release a patch that fixes the BootHole flaw. However, this isn’t an easy task.

    The boot sequence is an essential part of keeping the operating system stable. As such, if Microsoft rushes out a buggy patch for the flaw, it will cause system instability.

    As a result of this, it may take Microsoft a while to release a patch that fixes BootHole. And we’re all reliant on Microsoft doing so.

  • Greg Joswiak replaces Phil Schiller as head of Apple marketing

    Marketing is a huge role inside of Apple that goes beyond simply advertising products, so this marks a significant change within the company. As Apple puts it, the marketing division is “responsible for Apple’s product management and product marketing, developer relations, market research, business management, as well as education, enterprise, and international marketing.” Joswiak has been in Apple leadership roles for more than two decades, and he’s led Apple’s worldwide product marketing for the last four years.

    Schiller has been with Apple since 1997, helping to steer the company from one of its lowest points to the technology juggernaut that it is today. While he’s been in charge of marketing, Schiller is also known for his involvement in Apple’s hardware, often presenting new products — like the previous Mac Pro — onstage at events.

  • Chromebook perks now include Google's Stadia service

    In fact, buying a Chromebook comes with two Stadia perks. The first offers $20 off the purchase of the Stadia Premiere Edition, which essentially replaces the Stadia Founder’s Edition cloud gaming hardware that launched and almost immediately sold out. But as the second perk points out, you don’t even need the Premiere Edition hardware: Chromebooks now ship with three months of Stadia Pro, the Stadia cloud gaming service. (Engadget previously reported the new Stadia perks.)

    Be aware that this is a trial. After the three-month service period expires, you’ll be signed up for Stadia Pro at $9.99 per month. Also, you’ll need to own a Chromebook released in June, 2017, or later.

  • Florida teen accused of Twitter [attack] pleads not guilty

    Tuesday's hearing in Tampa reportedly took place via Zoom. Clark is scheduled for a bond hearing Wednesday, with bail set at $725,000.

  • Twitter About To Be Hit With A ~$250 Million Fine For Using Your Two Factor Authentication Phone Numbers/Emails For Marketing

    There are many things that big internet companies do that the media have made out to be scandals that aren't -- but one misuse of data that I think received too little attention was how both Facebook and later Twitter were caught using the phone numbers people gave it for two factor authentication, and later used them for notification/marketing purposes.

Here’s the glaring potential flaw in Windows 10X devices as Chromebook competitors

Stop me if you’ve heard this before: Imagine an operating system that’s focused on using the web browser and you can’t install traditional desktop apps on. No, I’m actually not talking about Chromebooks, and if I was, that would be an outdated thought experiment since you can install full desktop Linux apps on Chrome OS. I’m talking about upcoming devices running Microsoft Windows 10X, a “lite” software platform that is reportedly debuting in roughly 9 months. You may not recall that Microsoft tried a similar approach in 2012 with Windows RT and the first Surface device. Read more Also: Linux Marketshare Dipped in July – But Not By Much! [Ed: No, it is wrong to base one's assessment on a Microsoft partner that pretends Android, ChromeOS etc. don't even exist]

OpenSUSE: Election Campaign and Leap 15.2 Install Party

  • Stasiek Michalski answers Richard Brown's questions as the openSUSE election campaign progresses

    Community members are welcome to ask the candidates questions about their views on the project and to comment on some of the pertinent matters within the community. Richard Brown, former Chairman of openSUSE, put a few questions to Stasiek Michalski about his views on conflict resolution, the board structure and the project's key sponsor SUSE. Stasiek expressed his views as he answered Richard on the project mailing list.

  • Leap 15.2 Install party @ GOLEM - A quick report

    Ah, the event was also recorded, but they still have to let me know whether that worked well or not. I decided to do a live install as I think our installer is great, and wanted to show it off a bit. :-) In fact, I’ve heard a few times people saying that installing openSUSE is difficult, and I wanted to give it a shot to busting that myth. I showed how it is possible to install the distro with just a few clicks, which is the opposite of difficult. After that, I went back and explained all the various possible customizations that one can make – but only if she wants to– at each stage. Feedback on this was extremely good, and I think I’m going to reuse this same approach for other similar occasions. While the installer was copying packages, there was the time to talk a bit about the characteristics of Leap such as its goals, release cycle, development process, relationship with SLE, etc. I quickly mentioned the maintenance process, taking advantage of some slides kindly provided by Marina (thanks to you again as well!), and this also was perceived as very interesting. After the system was ready, I had the time to showcase YaST a little, to explain how to add Packman repos for the codecs and to introduce BTRFS snapshots, snapper and demo a reboot into a previous snapshot and the rollback.

Why I switched to Fedora

As stated above Fedora has a software freedom commitment similar in spirit to that of Debian. This means that you should be able to give Fedora to anyone, anywhere without violating intellectual property laws. Any software which is either not licensed in a way that Fedora finds acceptable or that bares US patent encumbrances can be found in the rpmfusion.org repository. After the install your next concern is undoubtedly configuring things and installing new packages. Fedora’s command-line package manager is dnf. It works as you would expect. Note also that since rpm uses file-based dependency tracking instead of package-based dependency tracking, as almost all others do, there are very few traditional metapackages. There are, however, package groups. Read more