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Security Showdown: Back & Forth

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security

Battles continue today in the M$ security war. Yesterday news began circulating that M$ Windows2003 server was found to be more secure than Redhat Enterprise. I'm skeptical until details of the study are released, as apparently they used the criteria of number of vulnerabilities reported and length of time before a patch was released for said vulnerabilities. However on the flip-side, former White House adviser Richard Clarke says during an interview at the same RSA computer security conference in San Francisco, he doesn't "know why anybody would buy from them" given their track record. He continues to offer evidence of apathy of M$ in the area of security and warns "industry and government need to pay greater attention to the risk of cyberterrorism." I guess this security topic will be bouncing back and forth for quite a while to come.

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