Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Fedora 24 Alpha a GO, DebConf16 Planning

Filed under
-s

Fedora 24 is back on schedule with the decision to release Fedora 24 Alpha, postponed last week because of blocker bugs. Jan Kurik, Platform and Program Manager, said Wednesday the blockers were fixed and "Fedora 24 Alpha release is considered as GOLD." Elsewhere, the Debian project put out the call for event proposals for upcoming DebConf16 in South Africa this July.

Read more

More in Tux Machines

Glimpse, the G-Rated GIMP Fork, Issues Its First Release

But before we go on to look at what’s on offer in this release I need to stress that I am not here to tell you what you should think. That said, forks of well known software projects (even super duper popular ones like The GIMP) happen all the time, for a variety of reasons, some of which might seem trivial or pointless to you. So regardless of whether the word “GIMP” does have negative connotations in your world or it doesn’t is by the by. With its first release now out of the door, the Glimpse image editor is beginning to stand on its own merits, to pursue its own path, and deserves to be evaluated on that basis. Read more

today's howtos

Games: VR, ASYLUM, Dota Underlords, Hypnospace Outlaw, Monster Sanctuary and Stadia

  • Valve are making the Index VR kit available in more countries

    If Valve want the new Half-Life: Alyx to be a success, they need to push VR into every possible country they can and they're working a bit more towards that. Announced early this morning (around 1AM UTC), the Valve Index is now being made available in Canada and Japan in addition to the availability in Europe and the USA. Half-Life: Alyx doesn't require the Index though, Valve did say it will work with any PC VR kit but this will probably give the best experience.

  • Supernatural horror adventure ASYLUM looks creepy as hell in the latest footage

    ASYLUM is an upcoming supernatural horror adventure from developer Senscape, it's high up on our list to check out when it releases and the latest footage is looking great. Released a few days ago is a new short video, with what Senscape say is entirely "100% in-game without any processing".

  • Dota Underlords adds Duos team creation and ranked play, next major update coming soon

    Dota Underlords is steadily getting better and another update is now out with some interesting new features for playing with a friend in the Duos mode. You can now get a persistent team for people you regularly team up with. Once you've played three matches with another, it will also unlock the ability for you to actually name your team. You'll be able to change your team name every three matches. Making it more interesting, it tracks some stats too like number of matches played and your record.

  • Completely bizarre 90's internet simulator Hypnospace Outlaw adds mod support

    Hypnospace Outlaw could easily win the award for the strangest game of the year, giving you a retro-futuristic look at the internet and now it's getting bigger. No More Robots and Tendershoot just recently gave it modding support, so now you can create pretty much anything in it. Webpages, images, wallpapers, soundscapes, entire zones, fonts, characters, file downloads and a huge amount more. They said it's now possible for someone to create their own full Hypnospace story.

  • Try out some monster catching in Monster Sanctuary, now with an updated demo

    Currently in Early Access, Monster Sanctuary might not be finished by so far it's turned out a lot of fun. They're giving more people a chance to now try it, with an updated demo. This demo update comes shortly after a big update to the full game, which included a whole new area to explore with Horizon Beach. A new story arc based around a treasure hunt, eight new monsters to collect (most of which water themed) along with new items and rare equipment. All sounds pretty great. You can also find the Monster Farm, a place to let all your creatures go out into the open and see them, which does look pretty sweet.

  • Some early first impressions of Google Stadia played on Linux

    Stadia has launched if you have the Founder Edition, our unit and code came a little late but it's here and surprisingly it all seems to be working well. This new game streaming service from Google is powered by Debian Linux and the Vulkan API, so I've been rather keen to what it has to offer. Keep in mind you will need a good internet connection for it and you do always need to be online, although it's supposed to keep your place for 15 minutes to help with drop-outs and changing devices. Quite a rough start, as they were clearly sending out codes slowly in batches. Something which wasn't explained properly. However, every Founder should now have access with them moving onto sending codes for those with the Premier Edition next week. I do hope Google learn to communicate better in future.

today's leftovers

  • Intel's Open-Source Gallium3D Driver Achieves OpenGL 4.6 Conformance

    The Khronos Group has officially confirmed Intel's new "Iris" Gallium3D driver as being a conformant OpenGL 4.6 implementation. The Khronos Group has awarded the Intel Iris Gallium3D driver as being a conformant OpenGL 4.6 implementation in successfully passing all of the necessary OpenGL CTS test cases. As we've been saying, the Intel Gallium3D driver is in great shape with Mesa 19.3 and these Khronos conformance results confirm that it's successfully behaving in-line with their specification.

  • Choosing the correct representation for storing Dates and Times

    There are multiple ways of representing the same moment in time. Each representation can store one or more distinct pieces of information. The more information we have, the wider we can use the DateTime unit. In the example of tracking package delivery times, we want to know two different things: the local date and time, as well as the absolute UTC date and time.

  • Opinion: Blocking the Disabled on the Web Means Blocking Innovation

    Without the inspiration and innovation of two disabled individuals, the digital world likely wouldn’t be what it is today. Yet that same world so summarily excludes disabled individuals today that we’re eliminating the very people we will need to solve the web’s future problems.

    Since the Americans with Disabilities Act was passed in 1990, our nation has worked to accommodate the needs of the disabled. Because of this, almost one in five disabled adults are now employed. But equal access has been ignored in the digital world. Almost 98 percent of the homepages of the top million websites are to some degree inaccessible today.