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Happy Mother's Day

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Rather more closely aligned to our Mother's Day, is the "Mothering Sunday". England observed "Mothering Sunday", or the "Mid-Lent-Sunday, on the fourth Sunday in Lent to honor the goddess Brigid, and later her successor St. Brigid, connected with the first milk of the ewes.

In the United States, Anna M. Jarvis (1864-1948) is credited with bringing in the celebration of Mother's day.

In the U.S., in 1908 Ana Jarvis, from Grafton, West Virginia, began a campaign to establish a national Mother's Day. Jarvis persuaded her mother's church in Grafton, West Virginia to celebrate Mother's Day on the anniversary of her mother's death. A memorial service was held there on May 10, 1908 and in Philadelphia the following year where Jarvis moved.

Jarvis and others began a letter-writing campaign to ministers, businessmen, and politicians in their quest to establish a national Mother's Day. They were successful. President Woodrow Wilson, in 1914, made the official announcement proclaiming Mother's Day a national observance that was to be held each year on the 2nd Sunday of May.

Jarvis' Poem.


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