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Gentoo celebrates third Bugday anniversary with a live penguin.

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Gentoo

For the last three years, the Gentoo project has run monthly Bugday events to encourage users and developers to team up and help to solve as many bugs as possible in a day. The first such event was held on Saturday August 2nd, 2003, and has continued on the first Saturday of each month ever since, with members of both the user and developer communities meeting in #gentoo-bugs on the Freenode IRC network to work together on Gentoo's list of open bugs.

Now, for the third anniversary of the initiative, the Bugday team has something special planned. They have teamed up with sponsors including Genesi, the power.org community, and thelinuxshop.co.uk to bring a range of exciting prizes to those who can solve the most bugs in the day, as well as several quizzes with prizes going to the winners. The star prize will be a real life Chilean Gentoo penguin, whose adoption for one year has been sponsored by one generous user. The winner will not only be able to name the bird, but will receive regular updates and pictures charting its progress.

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Gentoo Weekly Newletter I

Gentoo Weekly Newletter

I was especially taken by the quote from Developer of the Week Thomas Cort: "If you make something simple enough bfor an idiot to use, only an idiot will want to use it."Simply said, point taken. I have read some criticisms on Gentoo with egards to installation and reading the manual over and over again. I guess if we want something bad enough, we're just going to have to work for it. Besides, all fine "machineries" needs a break-‌in.

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