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The Art and Design of Quake 4

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Gaming

AFTER BEING ANNOUNCED nearly four years ago at QuakeCon 2001, how much do we really know about Quake 4? We know the single-player game will continue the story of the Strogg introduced in Quake 2; that it's being developed by Raven Software (creators of the Soldier of Fortune games as well as the latest Jedi Knight games) under the watchful eye of franchise creator id Software; and that it's using the same next-gen technology used to power 2004's DOOM 3.

After that, there's really not much more we know for sure. Screenshots have been particularly hard to come by, so to get some more info on the look and design behind Quake 4, we went straight to the source -- Raven Software project lead Eric Biessman, Raven art lead Kevin Long, and id Software designer Tim Willits, who's been heading up things on id's end. Along the way, they were kind enough to provide us with a few new screenshots and concept art, including a before-and-after showing an area from sketch to how it looks in the game.

We catch up with members of Raven and id Software to talk about the visual stylings of the latest Quake installment.

Full Article.

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