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Revoltec Graphic Freezer and be quiet! Polar Freezer

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Some people do not care about noise much and simply want good performance; other people want good performance but require silence while some require only their system to be as silent as possible while keeping components running cool enough to be safe. The answer comes from Revoltec and be quiet!, sister companies to each other, in the form of the Graphic Freezer and Polar Freezer respectively. One is active and offers strong while not noisy operation and the other is completely silent since it is passive. The trick is that both can be mounted on most video cards available at the moment, despite the manufacturer or graphics chip. Let us see what they have to offer the hardware enthusiast.


be quiet! Polar Freezer specifications

  • Weight: 480gr

  • Dimensions: 95mm x 130mm (top heat sink), 86mm x 130mm (bottom heat sink)
  • Material: Aluminum, Copper, nickel plated super conductor tubes.
  • Heat dissipation: Up to 90W.
  • Fanless design, 0dBa.

Revoltec Graphic Freezer specifications

  • Material: Copper and Aluminum

  • Color: Copper, blue illumination
  • Measurements: 110 x 99,7 x 31,6 mm (Cooling Unit), 20 x 20 x 5 mm (RAM heat sinks)
  • Connection: 3-Pin with speed monitoring capability (4- to 3-Pin Adapter included)
  • Fan: 60mm x 60mm x 12mm

Full Review.

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