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Autodesk Unveils Linux Supported Maya 8

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Software

Autodesk launched Autodesk Maya 8 software, the newest version of its Academy Award-winning 3D modeling, animation and rendering solution. Maya has been used by a variety of clients, including BMW, CNN, Disney, Epic Games, Industrial Light & Magic, Midway Games and Weta Digital, to create breathtaking 3D imagery for feature films, interactive games, broadcast graphics and industrial design. Autodesk Maya 8 meets the demands of next- generation productions by addressing the real-world production challenges 3D artists are currently facing.
Maya 8 offers a combination of 64-bit support, multithreading and algorithmic optimizations that enable artists to load massive datasets and interact with them more efficiently than ever before. Key areas of the software, including skinning, draw tessellation, and subdivided polygon proxy meshes, have been multi-threaded to scale with the number of processors or cores available, thereby accelerating formerly time-consuming tasks on today's workstations and those of the future.

Maya 8 offers a host of productivity advancements, particularly for modeling and texturing. The Transfer Polygon Attributes feature enables modelers to transfer UVs, color per vertex (CPV), and vertex position information between surface meshes of differing topologies. This is particularly useful when working with two different versions of an object or character, e.g. one that is high-resolution and one that is low-resolution. In addition, new and improved workflows and tools such as Polygon Bridge, multiple edge loop insertion and enhanced UV layout help maximize productivity for the most common tasks.

Maya 8 enables artists to better manage data when using multiple 2D and 3D packages within the production pipeline.

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