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A geo-located photo album in five easy pieces

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HowTos

Open standards, and openness in general, enables people to combine a variety of technologies in new and interesting ways. For example, using a camera with Exif support, a GPS receiver, the Google Maps API, and Perl, PHP and JavaScript, Mike Whitton created a Web-based photo album in which the photographs are automatically placed on a map at the exact location they were taken. Let's take a look at how this is done.

The project was inspired by, and is loosely based on, Tim Vidas' work, with numerous additional refinements. See Figure 1. to get an idea what the finished product looks like.

The project makes use of the Google Maps' "info window" feature. This feature includes the ability to created tabbed info windows, in which a map pin can represent more than one photo at a particular location. Each tab shows a different thumbnail image, clicking on the image displays a full size picture; see see Figure 2 for a sample.

Building a geo-located photo album requires five major components:

Full Story.

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