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Quake 4 confirmed for Q4

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Gaming

As part of Activision's earnings call today, CEO and president Ronald Doornink answered the customary questions from game industry analysts. And in so doing so, he revealed Activison's lineup for the 2005 holiday season, a roster that will make the company a formidable adversary to its rival publishers.

Speaking to analysts, Doornink outlined Activision's plans for its third fiscal quarter, which will run from October to December 2005. "In the [fiscal] third quarter, we plan to release our strongest and most diverse lineup ever--specifically, brand-new games for Tony Hawk, Call of Duty, X-Men [Legends], True Crime, Quake, and Shrek. Each of these franchises is targeted at a different consumer."

With that statement, the CEO put a release window on the next installments in Activison's premier franchises. Though Call of Duty 2 has been slated for fall for some time, previously, X-Men Legends II, True Crime 2, and Tony Hawk's Underground 3 were expected only sometime during Activision's fiscal year 2006 (April 2005 to March 2006). The games' existences were first revealed last summer and fall.

For PC gamers, the biggest news was that the long-awaited next installment in the Quake franchise will indeed arrive in 2005. Given the time frame, the Raven-developed, Doom 3-engine-based shooter will arrive almost exactly one year after Half-Life 2, the current top-selling shooter for the PC.

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