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Linux Patch Management: Keeping Linux Systems Up to Date

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Michael Jang has written a new book in Bruce Perens' Open Source Series tackling the often sticky subject of Linux patch management. Targeted squarely at the busy network admin who needs to get up to speed on Linux, it promises to cover system updating and package repository set-up from the ground up. Not only that, but to do so for a variety of distributions. Let's see how it does!

It's All About the Layout

Book layout is important, and Linux Patch Management (LPM) uses it's pages to good effect. Brief synopsis head up each chapters sub-section to give you an overview of what you're about to read. Each chapter after the first is likewise laid out to cover separate types of repositories and their uses, as in a production environment you won't likely need to reference all the different repository types.

Spiced throughout the book are authors notes to point out a particular feature or pitfall to be aware of. They're particularly good for administrators new to Linux who might get caught by Linux specific "gotchas".

Looking Between the Covers

Full Story.

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