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Ladislav Bodnar - Keeper of the Record

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While Ladislav is vacationing in sunny Fiji, I figured this would be the perfect time to talk about him behind his back. I'm sure no one reading this is clueless to the fact that Ladislav Bodnar is our benevolent 'keeper of the record.' One can find some nice introductory information on DW's about page. However, as informative as that page is, I wanted to know more. I'm not the typical female found about. Linus Torvalds is "The King." Some of my favorite bands are SUSE, PCLOS, and of course, Gentoo. New distros headline my Saturday night rave. Distrowatch is my Rolling Stone magazine. As such, I've always found Ladislav to be of particular interest. We've had a few email exchanges and I've monitored Distrowatch closely over the years. I found the Distrowatch Weekly offered a bit of an insight to the personality of Ladislav, but I had no idea the depths of this gentleman until he reluctantly agreed to answer my interview questions. I hope you find him as fascinating as I do.

Ladislav Bodnar, who will turn 41 next month, was born in eastern Czechoslovakia and spent most of his formative years in Kosice. He "studied metallurgy at the Technical University in Ostrava, Czechoslovakia, majoring in metallurgy of non-ferrous metals" and subsequently worked in Prague. In 1991 he moved to South Africa where he "spent ten years working for several mining/metallurgical companies." In 2001 he relocated to and currently resides in Taipei, Taiwan with his wife and "two naughty parrots."

Full Story.

Ladislav

Thanks for this. I have long admired the fantastic effort that is DistroWatch, and have wondered about Ladislav. An enjoyable read.

re: Ladislav

Thank you so much for saying.

And personally, he's a really nice guy too.

(Dang, I probably should have mentioned that!) Big Grin

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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