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Consumer-Friendly Linux Distro Found in Linspire Five-O

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Linux
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The Linux operating system is adored by software developers, and for good reason. Everything in Linux is "open," which is to say that you can get inside any application, no matter how complicated, and modify it to your heart's content. Or, you can write new code for your own use and share it with the global Linux community. Linux is grassroots programming, driven by the users it serves rather than the corporations that market the software.

Because Linux in its various incarnations is the product of a worldwide brain trust, it is never "finished," per se; Linux is undergoing constant improvement. With so many brilliant minds at work, most versions of Linux have become highly stable and efficient. The infamous Windows "blue screens of death" are unknown in Linux. Virus attacks are also unknown -- although not impossible.

Full Story.

Freespire Beta 1 is available now

The first beta of Freespire -the open and free version of Linspire- has been released.

Check it out here:

http://wiki.freespire.org/index.php/Download_Freespire

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