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Sarah Sharp Steps Down As Linux Kernel Developer

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Linux

Sarah Sharp: “I’m not a Linux kernel developer any more”

Linux kernel dev who asked Linus Torvalds

Kernel Anniversary Marked by "Without Linux" and Resignation

  • Kernel Anniversary Marked by "Without Linux" and Resignation

    Today marks 24 years since Linux Torvalds released version 0.01 of the Linux kernel to the benefit of humanity. The day was marred by the resignation of Sarah Sharp saying, "I am no longer a part of the Linux kernel community" due to "blunt, rude, or brutal" communication. The Linux Foundation today announced a new video series titled World Without Linux that will highlight the vast ecosystem spawned from that original 10,239 lines of code.

Going my own way

Another Longtime Linux Developer Looks To Distance Himself From

Matthew Garrett Forks the Linux Kernel

  • Matthew Garrett Forks the Linux Kernel

    Just like Sarah Sharp, Linux developer Matthew Garrett has gotten fed up with the unprofessional development culture surrounding the kernel. "I remember having to deal with interminable arguments over the naming of an interface because Linus has an undying hatred of BSD securelevel, or having my name forever associated with the deepthroating of Microsoft because Linus couldn't be bothered asking questions about the reasoning behind a design before trashing it," Garrett writes. He has chosen to go his own way, and has forked the Linux kernel and added patches that implement a BSD-style securelevel interface. Over time it is expected to pick up some of the power management code that Garrett is working on, and we shall see where it goes from there.

Matthew Garrett Leaves Linux Kernel and Forks It

  • Matthew Garrett Leaves Linux Kernel and Forks It

    Now, another Linux kernel developer has decided to move away from the project. Matthew Garrett has been in the news a lot this past year, but surprisingly, not for the Linux kernel. He's been a constant critic of Canonical IP policy, and he has criticized the company more than once. In fact, he's a rather well-known kernel developer, and he had his fair share of disputes with Linus Torvalds. Unlike Sarah, he made his reasons a lot more clear.

Matthew Garrett Quits Kernel to Do His Own

  • Matthew Garrett Quits Kernel to Do His Own

    Matthew Garrett, noted developers and self-proclaimed social justice warrior, today announced solidarity with Sarah Sharp's resignation in protest of rude behavior and the "way [Linus Torvalds] behaves" by providing a Linux kernel with changes rejected by Torvalds. Elsewhere, Jack M. Germain said Slackel offers advantages over Slackware but it's still not for new users and DarkDuck found most Linux users still use Windows or Mac as well.

Linux Game of Thrones begins

Looking at the facts: Sarah Sharp’s crusade

  • Looking at the facts: Sarah Sharp’s crusade

    Everyone is free to have his own opinion (sorry, his/her), and I am free to form my own opinion on Sarah Sharp by just simply reading the facts. I am more than happy that one more SJW has left Linux development, as the proliferation of cleaning of speech from any personality has taken too far a grip.

It's Time to End the War On Stupid People

  • It's Time to End the War On Stupid People

    On the other hand, it's little mystery at all: Sarah was the first female kernel contributor I'd ever heard of, and the only one I can readily name now. It's an uncomfortable answer, because when someone breaks into a space that doesn't often include their gender or background, we feel we avoid culpability by being nonchalant. No exclusion here, nosiree. Didn't even notice you were a woman. It's comforting and dishonest; when someone breaks a boundary of cultural exclusion, regardless of how your reaction may later be judged, the fact is you notice.

    Although apparently nobody noticed when Sarah quietly disappeared over the past year, finally coming out to cite now-familiar complaints about the toxic and hostile atmosphere on LKML and in the kernel community in general.

Pining for the good ol' days

  • Pining for the good ol' days

    Once again, he's complaining about how the fun from Debian has been lost because making sexist jokes, or treating other people like shit is not allowed any more. He seems to think the LKML is the ideal environment and that Debian should be more like it.

Linux kernel development suffering from the "internet of hate"

Internet of hate

"internet of hate" hits the point. People have the tendency to do things on the internet that they would not dare do or say to your face.

Is Microsoft Wooing Canonical & Important Departures…

  • Is Microsoft Wooing Canonical & Important Departures…

    Well, here’s the third, though it’s completely unrelated to Sharp and Garrett: The call went out in September for nominations for the Ubuntu Community Council elections, and they were returned with a glaring omission: Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph, who will not be running for re-election. She explains in her blog her motivations for moving on, and it’s well worth a read. Perhaps this is understatement, but her absence leaves a notable void in the “adult-in-the-room” department, since Elizabeth was often the voice of reason and sanity — and of course a voice for doing the right thing even when it was unpleasant or difficult for Canonical/Ubuntu — in a UCC group too full of yes-boys and Ubuntu Apocalypse zombies. Her leadership will definitely be missed.

James Bottomley: The Linux Kernel Mailing List Behavior Isn't Al

Matthew Garrett is not forking Linux

  • ​Matthew Garrett is not forking Linux

    When Matthew Garrett, well-known Linux kernel developer and ‎CoreOS principal security engineer, announced he was releasing a [Linux] kernel tree with patches that implement a BSD-style securelevel interface, I predicted people would say Garrett was forking Linux. I was right. They have. But, that's not what Garrett is doing.

Thick Skin (within Free/Open Source communities)<

  • Thick Skin (within Free/Open Source communities)

    The definition of “thick-skinned” in different dictionaries ranges from “not easily offended” to “largely unaffected by the needs and feelings of other people; insensitive”, going through “able to ignore personal criticism”, “ability to withstand criticism and show no signs of any criticism you may receive getting to you”, “an insensitive nature” or “impervious to criticism”. It essentially describes an emotionally detached attitude regarding one’s social environment, the capacity or ignoring or minimizing the effects of others’ criticism and the priorization of the protection of one’s current state over the capacity of empathizing and taking into account what others may say that don’t conform to one’s current way of thinking. It is essentially setting up barriers against whatever others may do that might provoke any kind of crisis or change in you.

Still discussed

  • Linux Discussion Continues, Fedora Welcomes Chromium

    Folks are still discussing the resignation of Sarah Sharp and Matthew Garrett from Linux kernel development. Jack Wallen said Sharp (and Garrett) are cases of more developers being "turned away, simply because developers had no patience for personal respect." He said Linux rules with a "sharp and iron tongue" with "foul and abusive language." He agreed with Dr. Roy Schestowitz in that all this is a "PR nightmare" threatening the "flagship of the open-source movement." He placed part of the blame on what he calls the "Internet of hate" and said if Linux is to compete with Microsoft and Apple its developers need to "start treating the legions of programmers, who are working tirelessly to deliver, as well as they treat the code itself. Open source is about community. A community with a toxic foundation will eventually crumble."

  • Linus Torvalds needs to fix the communication bug that is hurting his project
  • Respect and the Linux Kernel Mailing Lists

Good Software, Bad Behavior

  • Good Software, Bad Behavior

    You might say that those who are critical of the behavior on the list are not grateful for their work, and to make that assumption is a laughable mistake. It’s not the work under indictment, once again it’s the attitudes. The prevailing caustic attitude may change and it may not, but if the latter course is chosen, then the list continues in its cancerous way at its own peril.

On Lars Wirzenius, Martín Ferrari, and Debian

  • On Lars Wirzenius, Martín Ferrari, and Debian

    All this dispute centers around people not being capable to distinguish two things: One, being against the Code of Conduct due to the inclusion of administrative actions without clear definitions, and Two, being pro offensive behavior and and insults. Now, dear Lars^WWirzenius, please listen: I never advocated abusive behavior or insults, nor do I defend it. (Did you hear that!) I simply opposed the Code of Conduct as ruling instrument. And what kind of emails I got due to my opposition was far outside the Code of Conduct you are so strongly defending.

Old But Relevant


Sarah Sharp recently posted a tirade about verbal abuse on here and
her blog - where she dismisses all comments disagreeing with her as
being from trolls, and deletes them - and takes pride in being
"accidentally racist", when she's not attention-whoring on the LKML.

I want to say, as a female developer: Sarah Sharp is not
representative of us. She's not representative of the women at Intel.
She's not representative of women in technology.

She's a bully. She bullies her husband. She dismisses bullying of her
coworkers. (Google: 'intel kick me'). And she's trying to bully Linus.

I know he's a big boy. But dare I say, Linus is too nice to tell this
drama queen to bugger off.

No one was talking to her. Linus' 'Shut the fuck up' was to a
developer who refused to take responsibility for his code, and blamed
someone else's code. It was deserved criticism. Then, Linus went and
explained just that:

"Similarly, you will see fireworks if some long-term maintainer makes
excuses for breaking user space etc. That will make me go into
incoherent rages."

Which is exactly what the emails held up as "verbal abuse" show.

Sarah's exclaiming how she won't take any of this abuse, yet no one
was directing any of it at her. It's sickening she's got nothing
better to do then stick her nose in and decide to dictate to her
betters how to behave.  Yes I said her betters: We all run Linux. Not
Sarax.

Sarah justifies pissing in the Linux sandbox because Intel 'pays her'
to develop kernel drivers.  Perhaps her direct manager might rethink
this decision in light of how she's representing Intel in her "off"
time.

To Linus: You're a hero to many of us. Don't change. Please. You DO
NOT need to take time away from doing code to grow a pair of breasts
and judge people's emotional states:

"It does not matter if your cursing fits have causes.  The fact is that
if you misjudge someone's emotional state for the day, you yelling at
them is not productive."

As a woman, I couldn't be silent and stand by while Sarah bullied and
assaulted this list with her profanity and self-indulgent narcissism.
She's the problem. Not you. Not your style of communication.  We
technical women appreciate being treated equally by our male peers,
with blunt directness and unambiguous criticism.  We are not fragile flowers.

We can do our jobs without demanding others interact with us on our
terms and tiptoe around our fragile egos while being considerate of
our ever changing emotional needs.

I promise you, it's true.   We're not all Sarah Sharps.

I see a lot of the devs including Linus handling her with kid gloves
to be diplomatic. Don't.  If you want to be really nice, maybe drop an
email to her direct manager extending an apology for how hurtful it
was to her, having to observe others having a conversation in which
she wasn't involved.  Managers like hearing about that.

We love you Linus, just the grumptastic way you are. Don't change how
you interact, especially because of Sarah Sharp and her ilk. Please and
thanks..

The original just reposted in Linux Today.

On Planet Debian and the Code of Conduct (Norbert Preining)

  • On Planet Debian and the Code of Conduct

    I am not going to talk about Norbert Preining's continuous ranting against Debian's Code of Conduct. Suffice to say that it annoys me, and that I think he is wrong.

GROBR: a drama queen quits the Linux community

  • GROBR: a drama queen quits the Linux community

    Sharp, who had been maintainer of the USB 3.0 tree, came to prominence two years ago when she attacked Linux creator Linus Torvalds, who is also head of the kernel project, for his verbal attacks on other developers who erred in their coding. It turned out that she had planned this to perfection.

    The whole episode bears some re-examining, especially in light of the fact that since the 2013 exchange between Sharp and Torvalds, the latter has not spoken a word against anyone. The Linux Foundation, his employer, took note of the exchange by putting some curbs on him in the form of what it called a code of conflict which was merged into the kernel itself.

Feminists Are Trying To Frame Linus Torvalds For Sexual Assault

  • Feminists Are Trying To Frame Linus Torvalds For Sexual Assault, Claims Open Source Industry Veteran

    Feminists in tech have been staging attempted “honey traps” to frame prominent male software developers for sexual assault, according to explosive claims on the blog of Eric S. Raymond, a pioneer of the open source movement. In allegations that will rock the world of software development, prominent targets included Linus Torvalds, creator of the Linux kernel.

  • From kafkatrap to honeytrap

    The short version is: if you are any kind of open-source leader or senior figure who is male, do not be alone with any female, ever, at a technical conference. Try to avoid even being alone, ever, because there is a chance that a “women in tech” advocacy group is going to try to collect your scalp.

Are feminists targeting Linus Torvalds for sexual assault charge

Report: Feminists Trying To Frame Open-Source Leaders For Harass

Linus Torvalds targeted by honeytraps, claims Eric S. Raymond

  • Linus Torvalds targeted by honeytraps, claims Eric S. Raymond

    Celebrity programmer Eric S. Raymond has aired a theory that feminist activists are trying to find a way to lay false sexual assault claims against male leaders of the open source community.

    Raymond is best known for his seminal tract The Cathedral and the Bazaar, and remains active in the world of open source, which he has championed since the late 1990s.

Are SJWs Trying to Frame Linux Creator Linus Torvalds...

  • Are SJWs Trying to Frame Linux Creator Linus Torvalds With Fake Sexual Assault Charges?

    As I said, I don't take this rumor seriously. But unconfirmed rumors don't go viral without deep reasons. In this case, the reason is that Raymond's post touched an open nerve. Unfortunately, there are more and more disturbing cases of political correctness run dangerously amok in the tech world. Last year, there was the ridiculous "bullshirtstorm." A few months ago GitHub, the repository hosting service used by many open source software projects, proposed to adopt a code of conduct that explicitly endorsed "reverse" racism and sexism. The project was paused after a wave of outraged reactions, but interestingly Github never clearly admitted that the project is on hold.

  • How bad a boss is Linus Torvalds?

    The difference between the leaders at big proprietary software companies and Torvalds is that he says everything in the open for the whole world to see. The others do it in private conference rooms. I’ve heard people claim that Torvalds would be fired in their company. Nope. He’d be right where he is now: on top of his programming world.

    Oh, and there’s another difference. If you get, say, Larry Ellison mad at you, you can kiss your job goodbye. When you get Torvalds angry at your work, you’ll get yelled at in an email. That’s it.

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