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Grumpy old git!

Why is it that some drivers, on open roads, fail to see the speed limit signs? Why? I don't mean they are speeding, I mean they are driving slower. Much slower. 25mph in a 30mph zone, 40mph in a 50mph zone! Come on! These are open roads with no room to overtake it is so frustrating! And that white circle with a black line? IT MEANS 60MPH NOT 40!!! (motorway 70 accepted)

I have a life and I hate wasting it in traffic but I put up with it. It is only when I see open road in front of the vehicle I'm trapped behind and the said vehicle is trundling along 10-20mph under the given speed limit that the temperature truly rises. Why is it as soon as I am stuck behind one, I need the bathroom? We need blue flags, "speed up or pull over!". Surely your home life can't be that bad!!

Another pet hate about driving, whats with all the MBN's (Mobile Bottle Necks - trucks/caravans/cranes), there're 3 lanes, a truck pulls out to overtake another plodding vehicle and it takes forever to pass! Effectively the motorway is now down to one lane. And when there're 4 lanes, they're blocking 3 of them!! Trucks (and all plodders) should be banned from motorways between 7am-9am and 4pm-6pm. I'm sure it would shave 30mins off the average commute time!

And while we're at it, have german cars always had psychic indicators and large magnets under the bonnet? No? Well push that lever, yes that one next to your steering wheel, yes that one... the one that makes those little orange lights flash and BACK OFF!! You'll look just the muppet in your own rear view mirror as you do in mine!

Ok, rant over with, that felt good. Now back to fighting corporate bureaucracy to get local admin rights on my development PC. Oh what joy. Happy days. At least I'm charging by the hour. Twiddle. Twiddle. Aching thumbs.

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I feel your pain.

You know, there are places they've actually gotten around some of that. In Texas, you can be ticketed for driving too slow. However, the kicker is that when somebody is behind you driving, say, 80 MPH, and you're driving the good old 55 MPH speed limit, you have to pull over and let them pass. Or else, you'll get a ticket. I'm not kidding, folks, this is really the law.

In Atlanta, they've instituted a rule that there is at least one and in some places more than one lane where trucks cannot go. No vehicle with more than four wheels can drive in that lane.

So there you go. Lobby to have these laws where you live, my friends. As for me... I know all the shortcuts. Wink

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