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good-bye Dapper

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Ubuntu

I’d like to say “good-bye and thanks for the fun,”, but it wasn’t fun.

I installed Ubuntu on my Thinkpad, 32-Kubuntu on one workstation, and Kubuntu AMD 64 on another. The second two are going the way of the dodo. What, you say, how can I be so mean to the darlingest Linux distribution of all? Easy. It started it.

Ever since I installed the *buntus, they’ve been nothing but trouble. Every day I’m fixing something. Breezy wasn’t too bad; just the usual hassles with printers and scanners, because mine are not well-supported in Linux. So that’s not *buntu’s fault. Things went majorly to pot when I dist-upgraded to Dapper, and that is *buntu’s fault:

Full Story.

So What?

I'm not sure what purpose articles like this serve?

So this one guy can't make his Distro work. Are we to assume that the other 10 million users (number pulled from ass - I have no clue how many people really use Dapper) of that Distro just have more patience, have higher tolerance for non-working software, don't use those non-functioning features, are too stupid to notice, what?

I can imagine that Shuttleworth is reading this guys article and then gets on the phone to headquarters saying "Ok guys, the scam is up, we've been outed, this Schroder guy says we suck so lets start shutting down the offices".

Who cares what this Schroder guy thinks, does, smells like? Do whatever it is you want to do, just stay off your whiny little soapbox.

Ubuntu is not for newbies

While I'm not particularly enamoured with Kubuntu Dapper Drake (I haven't tried Ubuntu), I think all this article shows is that there are Linux distros better suited for Linux newbies.

Part of the wonderful richness of Linux is the wide variety of distros. With due-dilligence (and some guidance), a suitable Linux distro can be found for almost any computer user.

Indeed, srlinux's most recent review (in my opinion, one of her best as she keeps getting better and better) discusses Xandros 4.0 which is probably much more suitable for the inexperienced Linux user. While it wouldn't be my preferred distro, it certainly has its place.

I do agree that the article comes across as petulant and whiney.

re: Ubuntu is not for newbies

gfranken wrote:

Indeed, srlinux's most recent review (in my opinion, one of her best as she keeps getting better and better)

Oh my goodness. Thank you for saying Kind Sir. Smile

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

You're supposed to haggle!

I must confess, some of the statements here found me a little bewildered. I'm new to linux, apart from an experimentation phase back in '00 with some Red Hat thing, not the sticky fumble I wish to recall. Ok, new to linux, brand new. I tried quite a few recently, suse (10.1), xandros (3.0), linspire (5.0), ubuntu (dapper 6.06) and I must say that ubuntu left the least mess and no wet spots. Xandros I didn't like, too much fiddle to get the wireless working, same with linspire and suse took forever to install and took its ball home when hitting the video card drivers. In fact they all did except ubuntu. Although, to its credit, xandros did come back when I functioned through the vid outputs. This linux thing was getting frustrating.

Back in the forums (pre Ubuntu) this name appeared again and again, ubuntu. What the hell, download, burn and install on my old test machine, toshiba satelite 25somethingorother dvd. Now all the others didn't like the trident 95wotsit card, ubuntu did. No frigging about with refresh rates and the megahurts of the korean screen assemblers tight underpants in X config files, it just worked. Next came the wireless card (netgear), my xandros ndiswrapper experience to hand (getting into this linux thing now!) and didn't need it. Connect it said and connect I did. Ok, now what? Why can't I play mp3's? A few google minutes later and voila, automatix installed and every codec I needed on it's way. Everything working and not a new grey hair in sight (although it is hard to guarantee that one).

After 3 days of ubuntu on the old laptop, I took the plunge, backed up (!!!!) the presario, read the last rights and installed it on my main laptop. The one my wife and I fight over... er share. Installed, everything working in less than an hour. Not one problem. Automatix and Synaptic clicks later and everything I need is on there. Ok, sometimes it's down to the prompt for a quick sudo, but I was like that in windows, wife likes the UI and hails the russian tv she watches online, media player st-st-st-stuttered when it played, totem? Nope, plays fine. Only gripe my wife has is the keyboard switcher, she translates, russian and english and swaps between the two. Ubuntu/gnome is a bit fiddly and doesn't quite work properly with layouts, I'll look at it later. I'm sure half an hour poking around will have the answer. As for hardware, scanners, printers, cameras, webcameras, usb memory keys, not one complaint.

So now Ubuntu is on two laptops and I ubuntu'd the server last weekend. That took a bit more fiddling/flattening/fiddling, being new to php, apache and mysql, remote desktop sessions, ftp and linux permissions but forums are friendly places and the answers are very forthcoming.

The "why move from windows" reason? I actually had to learn something that was on my CV for a contract! Learn it quick too! So now developing on linux, perl, tcl, python with apache and php. Plodding along.

I still need to keep the last remaining windows pc in the house for MS dev, but momo is looking interesting and I am keeping my eyes fixed on that one, and the fact that the russian input works better (for now). Plus my wife uses the remote desktop and controls XP from Ubuntu with no hassles.

So why bewildered? Well if a complete linux newbie (getting the lingo too now) can be a happy chappy with the install of desktop and server, I can't see why the complaints. Although I have used little else.

re: haggle

Wonderful post! Humorous as well. Thank you for your input.

I know I was quite impressed with that kubuntu 64.

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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