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Taking Tabs to the Limit with Tabbrowser Extensions

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Moz/FF

When you're hardcore about tabbed browsing, Tabbrowser Extensions is the way to go.

When I'm writing or researching, I often have 20 or 30 web pages open. My desktop would be in chaos and my productivity overing near zero without tabbed browsing.

Even with Firefox's tabbed browsing, I am only slightly better off, because, with that many tabs, their labels are unreadable. I've tried most of the tabbed browsing extensions available from the Firefox Add-ons page -- including Tab Mix, Tab Mix Plus, SuperT, Tabs Menu, and Tab Sidebar -- but none gave more than minor improvements to my work flow. The only tab extension that really makes me efficient is Tabbrowser Extensions (TE), or mozilla-tabextensions, as the Debian package is called for some reason. Not so much a single extension as a collection of related extensions, Tabbrowser Extensions is one of those projects that you have to admire for its sheer thoroughness. It boasts a comprehensive choice of settings and omits only a couple of minor pieces of everyday functionality that I would like.

The first time you open Firefox after installing TE, you can choose one of the Pre-set configurations for it. The most useful of these are Casual User, which is light on memory usage and modifies only a few of Firefox's default settings, and Heavy User, which enables all the options. You might also choose the Authors' settings, to see what the writer of TE prefers. However, whichever configuration you choose, you will probably want to begin by selecting Tabbrowser Extensions Settings from the new Tab menu in Firefox.

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