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Developer lowers Drupal's barrier to entry

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Interviews
Drupal

From a consumer perspective, I'd like open source to be ubiquitous to the point of invisibility. Using recent Ubuntu distros, I'm always shocked at how professional the environment feels. Just five years ago, you'd need to hunt down drivers and do a bunch of fiddling to get basic things like a sound card working. Now there are so many pushbutton ways to deploy open source tech, from OSes to CMS distros on Pantheon to buying an Android-powered mobile phone.

We're not quite to the point where CMS users can feel like open source is transparent; there's still a huge investment in vendors to give you the expertise to manage your Drupal or WordPress site, for example. But we're closer than we were a decade ago, and that's pretty exciting.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

What is open source project governance?

In many discussions of open source projects and community governance, people tend to focus on activities or resources like "speaking for the project" or "ownership of the web domain." While documenting these things is useful, they aren't truly governance matters. Alternately, others focus exclusively on technical matters like election rules, codes of conduct, and release procedures. While these might be the tools of governance, they're not governance itself. So what exactly is open source project governance? In short, governance is the rules or customs by which projects decide who gets to do what or is supposed to do what, how they're supposed to do it, and when. This definition of governance can prompt important questions for open source communities seeking to evolve their governance models. Let's explore how. Read more

Software: ledger2beancount, TenFourFox, KDE Itinerary, GCompris

  • Martin Michlmayr: ledger2beancount 2.2 released

    I released version 2.2 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter.

  • TenFourFox FPR23 available

    TenFourFox Feature Parity Release 23 final is now available for testing (downloads, hashes, release notes). This blog post was composed in the new Blogger interface, which works fine but is slower, so I'm going back to the old one. Anyway, there's no difference from the beta except for outstanding security fixes and as usual, if all goes well, it will go live Monday evening Pacific time.

  • April/May in KDE Itinerary

    It has been a busy two month since the last report again, KDE’s source code hosting is now using Gitlab, we got the 20.04 release out, notifications were significantly improved, and we are now leveraging OpenStreetMap in more places, with even more exciting things still to come. The global travel restrictions have been hampering field testing, but they have most certainly not slowed down the development of KDE Itinerary!

  • GSoC’20 Wrapping up Community Bonding Period

    As the coding period of GSoC is going to begin in the next 2 days. In this blog, I am going to write all about what I did during the community bonding period. During this period I have interacted with my mentors and finalized the multiple datasets of a few activities. Recently, the GCompris project has been moved to GitLab so I set up my account over there and also asked my mentors how can I push my branches to the server and everything else. I have also gone through the code of the memory activities and planned about the resources I will be using. I have also set up my environment as to how to test the GCompris on the android platform. I plan to start my work with the enumeration memory game activity so I have created a branch for it and pushed it to the server.

Security Leftovers