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Two new Cyanogen smartphones hit the market: Wileyfox launches Storm and Swift

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Android

Following in the footsteps of OnePlus, UK startup Wileyfox has released two low-cost, but decently specced, smartphones running on Cyanogen OS.

The more expensive of the two, Storm, will cost £199 and features a 5.5-inch full HD display, 20-megapixel auto-focus main camera from Sony and an eight-megapixel front shooter. The device runs on Qualcomm's 1.5GHz Snapdragon 615 processor with integrated LTE, and offers 32GB onboard storage, 3GB RAM, as well as expandable memory up to 128GB.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: AMD Energy Driver, Security Features and Statsfs

  • The New AMD Energy Driver Is Working Out Well On Linux For Per-Socket/Core Reporting

    Of the many features coming for Linux 5.8 one of the new drivers we are very much looking forward to is the AMD energy driver for finally exposing per-core and per-socket/package energy reporting of Zen/Zen2 CPUs under Linux. It's working out well so far in my evaluation. CPU energy/power reporting is something that I and many other Linux users have long wanted to see under Linux for Zen CPUs, since it's exposed after all on Windows with Ryzen Master and other software. In the past AMD also maintained the "fam15h_power" driver for power reporting back on Bulldozer CPUs. But until Google sent out RAPL Zen patches recently and this "amd_energy" driver was then sent out by AMD engineers, there wasn't much public activity on getting this capability for existing Zen processors. There has also been the out-of-tree "Zenpower" driver for offering this based on public MSR data for Zen, albeit that driver isn't mainline, not maintained by AMD, and conflicts with k10temp when loading.

  • Kees Cook: security things in Linux v5.5

    I got a bit behind on this blog post series! Let’s get caught up. Here are a bunch of security things I found interesting in the Linux kernel v5.5 release:

  • Statsfs: A Proposed Linux File-System For Kernel Statistics

    Statsfs is a new RAM-based file-system proposal by a Red Hat engineer that is designed for exposing kernel statistics to user-space. Currently when kernel subsystems want to expose different statistics to user-space, it's done via DebugFS (or sysfs). In the case of DebugFS, users generally need root privileges to access the data and users are often left to implement their own tools for each different subsystem exposing the statistics differently. Red Hat's Emanuele Giuseppe Esposito has hacked together Statsfs in order to reduce kernel duplication of different subsystems working on their statistics reporting, avoid dirtying DebugFS with different statistics code, and making it easier for user-space to aggregate and display different kernel statistics.

Games: Proton and New Games for GNU/Linux

  • Ethan Lee: Troubling Times for Porters in a Proton World

    It has been a while we did not get in touch with Ethan Lee directly, also know as ‘flibitjibibo’ on the interwebs. The man needs no introduction as he is behind the ports of numerous games on Linux (including Transistor pictured above), and the author of FNA, an multiplatform FOSS framework made to be compatible with the now-abandoned XNA from Microsoft. We had a long conversation back with him in the days (check out our podcast from that time). We thought it’s a good time to check with him what is going on now that Proton has been out for quite a while and we now have sufficient perspective on how it impacted the market of porting games on Linux.

  • Linux Gaming Has A Serious Problem That Nvidia And AMD Can Solve

    Through the lens of an enthusiast, Linux gaming is healthy. Valve and Codeweavers (the company behind Wine) have boosted its profile significantly since introducing Proton, a compatibility solution that lets you play literally thousands of Windows-only games across dozens of Linux distributions. Ditto that for great services like Lutris, which employs Wine and pre-configured scripts to make installing games from Epic, Origin and Blizzard a mostly painless click-and-go affair. But the real problem with Linux gaming in 2020 has nothing to do with actual games.

  • Missile Command: Recharged Blasts onto Nintendo Switch, Windows PC, Mac, and Linux

    Iconic interactive entertainment producer Atari® and developer Nickervision Studios are delighted to announce today that Missile Command: Recharged™, the neon-lit reimagining of the beloved classic, is now available on Nintendo Switch™ and PC, Mac, and Linux via Steam, with an Epic Games Store release coming soon! Based on the 1980 arcade classic, Missile Command: Recharged delivers a visually captivating, deliciously difficult experience designed for modern gamers and fans of the original, alike. Following a highly successful launch on iOS and Android mobile platforms, Missile Command: Recharged brings the fun to a broader audience for even more classically-inspired and fully-charged fun.

  • The Last Faith, a dark gothic metroidvania is coming to Linux

    Currently in development and crowdfunding on Kickstarter, The Last Faith looks like an impressively styled pixel-art dark gothic metroidvania. The Last Faith is a Metroidvania that promotes a deep exploration style gameplay with non-linear levels. While you travel around the giant map, you have control over the way you want to be next. Every single spot counts, as you can discover new items, new secret areas, particular puzzles to solve and unique enemies.

  • Try the updated free alpha of ski resort builder Snowtopia

    Snowtopia, currently in development with a free version available while it's early on continues to be a promising new building sim that has you build a ski resort. You've built theme parks, massive roller coasters, zoos and all sorts but a ski resort is another slightly different twist on the building and management sim. A genre I love because they're great fun to relax with and zone-out somewhat while you what everything. Snowtopia definitely has that enticing feel to it, the appreciation for people-watching as they all slide around on the snow. [...] A lot more is planned to come before it has a traditional Early Access release, which should hopefully be later this year. Going by a roadmap they shared you're going to need security personnel, there will be a research system, new animations for the skiers, more buildings, more objectives and so on. Impressive so far though and seems to work wonderfully already.

  • Red Planet Farming is a new free game about feeding colonists

    Growing crops on Mars is no easy task as you're about to find out with Red Planet Farming, a new and free strategy game. You take on the role of the Agricultural Director of Mars, your job is to ensure the survival of various outposts across the barren planet by producing food in various shelters. Not an easy job, due to the extreme and constantly changing weather patterns on Mars. You will be with dust storms, radiation, extreme cold, meteor showers and other terrible things. [...] Developed by a group of graduates and current students of the NYU Game Center in Brooklyn, New York. They received funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Games Production Grant, a yearly award to fund game development at the NYU Game Center to support and help raise understanding of science, technology and economics. You can read a little more on that here. They even had NASA lend a hand for some technical support and advice.

today's howtos

Proxmox VE 6 and later offers container features, better security

The virtualization industry is full of proprietary and open source products that provide IT administrators with a variety of options for deploying their virtual environments. One product in particular that has not received as much attention is Proxmox VE, an open source virtualization management platform that tightly integrates both the KVM hypervisor and Linux container (LXC) technologies. Proxmox VE's most recent release, 6.1, includes the latest updates to the product, such as new container features, easier management, better security and improvements in availability. Admins might choose a propriety product to get a system that's highly polished and well supported, or they might opt for an open source offering in order to have access to the codebase and reduce operating costs. Proxmox VE 6 released in July of 2019 and was quickly followed by version 6.1 that following December. [...] Proxmox Virtual Environment, or Proxmox VE, is a complete server virtualization platform based on the Debian GNU/Linux distribution. Proxmox VE is a free, open source OS and is known for its ability to manage both KVM and LXC in a single, unified platform. By incorporating both KVM and LXC into its platform, Proxmox VE can deploy a wide range of use cases. According to Proxmox VE documentation, the platform supports the most demanding Linux and Windows application workloads, while still delivering performance and high availability (HA). For example, admins can scale out compute and storage resources as their requirements change, starting with a single node and expanding to a large cluster to accommodate growing workloads. Read more