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Ways to Beautify Dapper

Filed under
Ubuntu

Sometimes people think of Linux as an ugly operating system - and sometimes it is, if you are using the default GNOME, and don’t appreciate the “beauty of simplicity.” Well, you can impress those people by showing them a desktop that doesn’t look that bad. Here’s a list of 9 ways to make Dapper Drake look good.

1. Use KDE. KDE is a very nice looking desktop environment and will impress a lot of people. Personally, I don’t like KDE - I definitely like how it looks, but not how it functions. This is an easy way to tell people “Hey! Ubuntu can run KDE too!”

2. Theme it up.

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