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Firefox for Dummies

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Interviews

Last Friday, we talked with Blake Ross, the 20-year old who started writing code for Netscape at age 14 and has since co-founded the Firefox project and SpreadFirefox.com. He is also author of the new book Firefox for Dummies.

Ross had more to say about his book and the Firefox competition with Microsoft’s Internet Explorer browser.

DANA GREENLEE: What were you trying to accomplish when you wrote your book FireFox for Dummies?

BLAKE ROSS: My intent for the book was not to just give the how of the product but to give the why of the product. I can’t tell you how many times people asked me, “Why would somebody design a piece of software to work like this?” They run into some kind of crash in Microsoft Word or some kind of feature that doesn’t work quite right. Because I was part of the team that designed the Firefox interface, the book goes into a lot of depth about why we made the decisions that we made early on.

GREENLEE: What kind of things are in the book that make it different?

Full Story.

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