Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A sad, slightly unreal IT story

Filed under
Misc

Ihad to spend 9 hours in Miami, waiting for a connecting flight. 9 hours wasn’t quite long enough to go out and about, but was long enough to get bored to death.

So, I decided that I would pay $7.95 for a “day pass” for the Wifi connection. The WiFi connection at the Miami airport is managed by people who don’t seem to know enough about computers to manage a home gaming LAN, let alone use Microsoft Server software for a real-life application (and, surprise surprise, nothing works).

What happened while I was trying to get my connection is simply unreal. It’s a story that is just hard to believe.

Full Story.

A sad, basically biased rant

Did the guy get shafted after buying a WiFi Day Pass - Yes.

Should the Pay-For WiFi Management Team and Support team take the rap - Yes.

Should we turn the whole story into some Anti-Microsoft rant - No.

Why is it when any little thing goes wrong, and Microsoft is involved, all the Mac/Linux Fanboy's pull out their soapbox and microphone and go into their Microsoft is the big bad wolf rant.

First off, lets get real. The business world is Dog-Eat-Dog, if Microsoft had a fraction of the problems all these fanboy rants imagined they did, big business would drop them like a hot rock.

Second, as a system architect, I deal with every OS on the planet. Any OS (yes, lets say that again - ANY OS) can either suck wind or work flawlessly - it all depends on what equipment it's running on and who set it up and manages it. Poor admins can screw up any OS.

When a drunk driver wraps a BMW around a lamp pole do we blame BMW, the Lamp Pole, the Booze Manufacture, or does the blame lie on the Driver - the moron that doesn't understand drinking and driving don't mix?

So your Pay-For WiFi connection sucked - how you blame Microsoft for that problem is beyond all logic.

Fanboy?

Should the Pay-For WiFi Management Team and Support team take the rap - Yes.

If the management team used the wrong equipment in the first place, as well as using the wrong admin types, then most definitely yes.

Should we turn the whole story into some Anti-Microsoft rant - No.

Again, back to using the right equipment for the right job. MS products have a proven track record of not being good.

Which ties in with:

When a drunk driver wraps a BMW around a lamp pole do we blame BMW, the Lamp Pole, the Booze Manufacture, or does the blame lie on the Driver - the moron that doesn't understand drinking and driving don't mix?

Bad analogy. BMW's are quality cars. MS is not quality software. Although, the part about the moron not understanding drinking and driving would be a problem. This part would be the sysadmin.

As you point out, any OS can work flawlessly if properly admin'ed, but that assumes that you're working with quality in the first place.

I have stopped working with MS since Windows 95 due to their ever changing internals, does not like to play with anyone else (let alone play nicely), bad documentation, and having to continually maintain a system that should only require minimal maintenance once it's installed and setup.

MS products have not measured up in that respect for me for a long time.

Also:

First off, lets get real. The business world is Dog-Eat-Dog, if Microsoft had a fraction of the problems all these fanboy rants imagined they did, big business would drop them like a hot rock.

What part of "Illegal Monopoly" and "Illegal business practices" that MS has been found guilty of did you forget? Not to mention the $billions (yes, billions with a 'b') that businesses have had to pay due to problems with MS products.

Businesses take a long time to change infrastructure due to expenses. Since MS was seen as the only option for a long time due to these practices, you're projecting the same fanboy attitude about MS products that you accuse Linux fanboys project about Linux.

So, let's get real. Are you promoting MS with this rant just because it's perceived to be the latest and greatest since sliced bread due to marketing hype? Or, as you imply by being a systems architect, you always promote the best tool for the job?

----
Ken
Slackin' since 1993
Registered Linux user #296561

Nothing like an expert opinion

alisonken1 wrote:

I have stopped working with MS since Windows 95 due to their ever changing internals, does not like to play with anyone else (let alone play nicely), bad documentation, and having to continually maintain a system that should only require minimal maintenance once it's installed and setup.

So you form your opinions based on your vast Microsoft experience gathered 10+ years ago?

vonskippy obviously didn't read properly

vonskippy's comment below shows his lack of proper reading skills.

First off, the mention of 'Safari' for his webbrowser should have twigged him that the author was running Mac OSX, not Linux.

Second, the final recommendation from the author was for Unix (which he also noted concerned other flavors of Unix besides Linux).

Sounds like vonskippy appears to be an MS fanboy rather than a real Systems Architect (note I emphasize SYSTEMS).

----
Ken
Slackin' since 1993
Registered Linux user #296561

99% windows only experience

Well some of us use Macs and Linux and when we network with them or connect them to other devices, they just work without any technical know how. Linux can be harder to set up, but when set up it doesn't fall apart, unlike Windows. This comment is probably from an IT shop with years of experience with Windows and knows next to nothing about the UNIXes. If this is your experience than Windows will probably "work" provided you constantly maintain and fiddle with it. Well I tried networking Windows - a supported version with DSL - I followed all the directions exactly - and it didn't work. Same with my mom. Now enter the Mac and Linux. I plug it in reboot my computer and it works. The set up was only a couple minutes and it worked fine the first time. Another difference of course was this was cable Internet. 99% of the problems in software are caused by Microsoft. People that spend all their time learning how to use Windows are probably going to be able to get reasonable performance out of it. What they don't realize that if they knew only 1% of what they knew about Windows about a Mac and Linux they would be 10x as productive on UNIX based systems like OS X and Linux.

Mac, Linux experience

How much experience do You have with Mac OS X 10.4, Ubuntu 6.06, Fedora Core 5, and Suse 10.1? Most people that say they have as many problems with Macs and Linux as Windows are comparing an ancient version of the Mac or Linux to the latest version of Windows.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Virtual Reality in Mixed Reality, Taskcluster Development

  • Building Bold New Worlds With Virtual Reality
    From rich text to video to podcasts, the Internet era offers an array of new ways for creators to build worlds. Here at Mozilla, we are particularly excited about virtual reality. Imagine moving beyond watching or listening to a story; imagine also feeling that story. Imagine being inside it with your entire mind and body. Now imagine sharing and entering that experience with something as simple as a web URL. That’s the potential before us.
  • This Week in Mixed Reality: Issue 3
    This week we’re heads down focusing on adding features in the three broad areas of Browsers, Social and the Content Ecosystem.
  • New to me: the Taskcluster team
    At this time last year, I had just moved on from Release Engineering to start managing the Sheriffs and the Developer Workflow teams. Shortly after the release of Firefox Quantum, I also inherited the Taskcluster team. The next few months were *ridiculously* busy as I tried to juggle the management responsibilities of three largely disparate groups.
  • Taskcluster migration update: we're finished!
    Over the past few weeks we've hit a few major milestones in our project to migrate all of Firefox's CI and release automation to taskcluster. Firefox 60 and higher are now 100% on taskcluster!

OSS Leftovers

  • After the First US Transaction, Propy Announces an Open Source Developer Program
    California-based blockchain startup Propy, is bringing the commercial use of blockchain technology to the US. After facilitating the first US Blockchain-based real estate deed in Vermont, Propy announced a new open source Developer Program. The idea behind Propy: it allows anyone to buy or sell real estate, anywhere, online. Propy provides an efficient crypto and fiat payment and an immutable record on the blockchain, ensuring that title deeds and property rights will be there forever.
  • Titus, the Netflix container management platform, is now open source
    Titus powers critical aspects of the Netflix business, from video streaming, recommendations and machine learning, big data, content encoding, studio technology, internal engineering tools, and other Netflix workloads. Titus offers a convenient model for managing compute resources, allows developers to maintain just their application artifacts, and provides a consistent developer experience from a developer’s laptop to production by leveraging Netflix container-focused engineering tools.
  • Netflix's Container Management System Is Now Open Source
    On Thursday Netflix announced it's made its home grown container management system, Titus, open source.
  • Lumina Networks on delivering open source SDN
    What kinds of companies should consider open source SDN, and what are the associated challenges in using such open source deployments? Lumina Networks has unrivalled expertise in working with customers and partners to deliver implementations, and explains its processes and outlines the benefits of using open source SDN.
  • Luxoft launches PELUX 1.0 open source platform for automotive
    Luxoft’s automotive division has launched PELUX 1.0, an open source platform available to developers. This has been developed from its PELUX software suite as used by carmakers and tier 1 suppliers to build converged infotainment, autonomous driving, communication, HMI and car body control systems.
  • Dev Preview: MongoDB Enterprise Running on OpenShift
    In order to compete and get products to market rapidly, enterprises today leverage cloud-ready and cloud-enabled technologies. Platforms as a Service (or PaaS) provide out-of-the-box capabilities which enable application developers to focus on their business logic and users instead of infrastructure and interoperability. This key ability separates successful projects from those which drown themselves in tangential work which never stops. In this blog post, we’ll cover MongoDB’s general PaaS and cloud enablement strategy as well as touch upon some new features of Red Hat’s OpenShift which enable you to run production-ready MongoDB clusters. We’re also excited to announce the developer preview of MongoDB Enterprise Server running on OpenShift. This preview allows you to test out how your applications will interact with MongoDB running on OpenShift.
  • Is Open Source The AI Nirvana for Intel? [Ed: openwashing a malicious company using buzzwords and urban myths]
  • Writing Chuck – Joke As A Service
    Recently I really got interested to learn Go, and to be honest I found it to be a beautiful language. I personally feel that it has that performance boost factor from a static language background and easy prototype and get things done philosophy from dynamic language background. The real inspiration to learn Go was these amazing number of tools written and the ease with which these tools perform although they seem to be quite heavy. One of the good examples is Docker. So I thought I would write some utility for fun, I have been using fortune, this is a Linux utility which gives random quotes from a database. I thought let me write something similar but let me do something with jokes, keeping this mind I was actually searching for what can I do and I landed up on jokes about Chuck Norris or as we say it facts about him. I landed up on chucknorris.io they have an API which can return different jokes about Chuck, and there it was my opportunity to put something up and I chose Go for it.

today's howtos

Security: Updates, IBM, Elytron and Container Vulnerability Scanning

  • Security updates for Friday
  • IBM Security launches open-source AI
    IBM Security unveiled an open-source toolkit at RSA 2018 that will allow the cyber community to test their AI-based security defenses against a strong and complex opponent in order to help build resilience and dependability into their systems.
  • Elytron: A New Security Framework in WildFly/JBoss EAP
    Elytron is a new security framework that ships with WildFly version 10 and Red Hat JBoss Enterprise Application Platform (EAP) 7.1. This project is a complete replacement of PicketBox and JAAS. Elytron is a single security framework that will be usable for securing management access to the server and for securing applications deployed in WildFly. You can still use the legacy security framework, which is PicketBox, but it is a deprecated module; hence, there is no guarantee that PicketBox will be included in future releases of WildFly. In this article, we will explore the components of Elytron and how to configure them in Wildfly.
  • PodCTL #32 – Container Vulnerability Scanning