Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reader's Questions to the Debian Project Leader

Filed under
Interviews

Last month Pro-Linux asked its readers to propose questions to ask the Debian Project Leader (DPL). Many readers took part and posted their questions to our forum. The topic was apparently interesting enough so that many comments, critical remarks, and questions were posted. From all proposals we chose ten questions for the Debian project. After DPL Anthony Towns, Steve McIntyre, one of his deputies, also volunteered to answer the questions. Therefore we got not only one answer for most of the questions, but two.

The Interview

Question: Some time ago Martin "Joey" Schulze abruptly retired from his position as the release manager of Debian stable. Did his criticism of the management of the Debian FTP masters, the very reason for his final retirement, have any visible effects on how Debian handles problems like these nowadays?

Anthony: Since the criticism was partly directed at me, I'll leave this one to Steve, as a more independent party.

Steve: In that particular case - stable release management - we have now established a team to keep the day-to-day work going. More generally, we are working on the communication problems that were the root cause of the problem. It may take a while for things to visibly change, but expect some progress.

Question: The DPL may largely be entangled in daily business to keep the project going, i.e. bureaucracy, politics and related issues. Do you have a personal dream or vision on what Debian should be like in a distant future?

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

Security News

Open Hardware

  • Accelerating Innovation: Michigan Tech patent database/app promotes open-source hardware
    Open-source innovation is making the traditional patent system obsolete. Michigan Technological University associate professor Joshua Pearce and his team work with what is called open-source hardware development. “What that means is sort of developing technologies that don’t rely on patents,” Pearce said. “We work collaboratively with engineers and scientists all over the world, and (it’s) fairly successful. And the reason it’s successful is because if you have thousands of people working on something, it tends to get pretty good pretty fast.” Pearce said the concept began some time ago with open-source software.
  • Non-profit creates open-source drinking water filter for 1/10th of the cost
    The high-tech vision of open-source software meets low-tech design at non-profit organization OHorizons, an international coalition of innovators working to solve persistent global challenges. The team’s most recent invention is the open-source Wood Mold, designed to allow even the least experienced person to create a BioSand Filter that can deliver clean water at 1/10th of the cost of the traditional method. The Wood Mold is designed to be accessible by anyone who has the DIY, open-source construction manual that OHorizons offers for free online.

Databases and GNU/Linux

Linux Graphics