Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Google Earth on Linux

Filed under
Google
Software
-s

In this first set of shots you can see the installer at work. Hmm, looks a bit "loki" to me. Big Grin I installed as my user into my home directory, so you won't have to trust google with your root access.

        

And here is our first glimpse as Google Earth is opened. Hmm, looks like the earth. Big Grin You can turn and tilt and zoom in or out by means of these little controls up in the right hand corner. They work really well.

        

It has some nice features. Some are only available if you sign up for their premium service, but some are freely accessible.

If you look around in the menus you can find options to print, email, or playback your "tours" or locations. I'm not sure what one would do with that image overlay, but that placemark is kinda obvious.

        

Opps, not available for free. You'll see that quite a bit, but in the second shot you can see a "ruler" dialogue. I presume that is to measure distances. In the third screenshot is where I've spent most of my life. Yep, the U! The circled building is where I've spent most of that time.

        

In these shots is where I've spent the 2nd most of my life. Yep, my house. Only these shots aren't nearly as clear as the ones I took from school when I was playing on their XP computers last semester. Go figure. In addition, my house happens to be the one most out-of-focus in the whole neighborhood. That's a metaphor for my whole life right there. Big Grin

    

Then you can take these little tours. Click on one of the supplied locations and the maps starts to zoom out, turn, and zoom back into the locale selected. Look how clear those jokers are. Big Grin

        

Then they have this "building layer" which I reckon adds a level of clarity to the city scapes by providing images of the .. er, buildings. That's kinda cool, but it didn't help my house.

        

And the best feature of all is the directions maps. Just supply two addresses and google earth will conveniently map out those pesky directions for those out of town or cross country stalking jobs.

Well, that's about all I played with. I downloaded, I installed, I played.

More in Tux Machines

OGP Toolbox deploys open-source tools to promote openness in government

The Open Government Partnership (OGP) recently launched the OGP Toolbox, bringing together digital tools to promote openness in government and improve democracy. Development of the platform started at a hackathon organised at last year's OGP Summit in Paris. The portal currently features 190 use cases, 1277 tools, and 521 organisations. Read more

MWC 2017: Dell's New Edge Gateway 3000 Series Are Powered by Ubuntu Core 16

MWC (Mobile World Congress) 2017 kicked off in Barcelona and Canonical is there to showcase their latest developments in mobile, cloud, server, and desktop. Today, the company announced that Dell's Edge Gateway 3000 would be on display at the event. Powered by the Ubuntu Snappy Core 16 operating system, which Canonical designed specifically for use in embedded and industrial devices, including single-board computers like the well-known Raspberry Pi, the small Dell Edge Gateway 3000 series come in three variants, each one targeted at a specific market. Read more

Why a Chrome OS and Android merger isn't what we really need

Lately I've been giving this question quite a bit of thought. I depend on both Chrome OS and Android. I use them throughout every day and would find my process a bit more challenging without them. When it was first announced that Chrome OS would be able to run Android apps, my initial thoughts were positive; I considered this move by Google to be the most logical step forward. It was clearly the best way to compete with the Microsoft Surface and to bring more users into the fold. Although chromebooks continually sell incredibly well, some consider Chrome OS to be less than a legitimate platform. Why? The lack of native apps. And that is why Google gave life to the Android Play Store on Chrome OS (at least for certain devices). Read more

Zorin OS 12.1 Adds Linux Kernel 4.8 and Updated Graphics Stack from Ubuntu 16.10

After announcing the release of Zorin OS 12 Business Edition last week, the developers behind the popular Ubuntu-based operating system unleashed the first point release to the Zorin OS 12 series. That's right, we're talking about Zorin OS 12.1, which comes three months after the launch of Zorin OS 12 in November 2016 as the biggest release ever of the Linux distro. Zorin OS 12.1 is now based on Canonical's recently released Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, which ships with updated kernel and graphics stacks from Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak). Read more