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Build a Desktop with Kubuntu 6.06 LTS

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Ubuntu
HowTos

Kubuntu is one great distribution. It has something for everyone. This How-To is going to cover as much as I can. I'll be adding and linking to it. Here are some Quick links within this article.

I have decided to use a new format for the Desktop How-to for this session. In the past I only covered the basic system build up but sent you to the Mini How-to's to configure the applications. This time I'll put it all in one document. Of course this will make this a much longer document but it will also be as complete as I can make it. I'll cover the install of the system along with all the additional softwares. Then we'll go through step by step configuration of the applications that we load. After all, what good is having all these fine apps without having a clue as to how to use them?? I'll cover the configurations and set up of the apps just like I use them everyday. I no longer run Windows except for work where its a windows environment. I'll cover some cool tips on that when I do the laptop config for dual booting in another How-to.

Let's speak about this fine distribution, Kubuntu. Its strengths lie in Debian and the Apt-Get package management system. This version, Kubuntu 6.06 LTS will have 3 years of desktop support and 5 years of server support. That's just amazing. There will be releases between new versions of the LTS releases and I'll cover how to upgrade to them as they come along. It's a very simple process. In fact when it comes time to upgrade, Most users will not have any problems with the process. Kubuntu is part of the Ubuntu foundation and in turn is supported by Canonical Inc. It's relatively new and has taken the Linux community by storm for several reasons. One being the simplicity of its operation and configuration. One other reason is its rock steady stability due entirely to its roots in the Debian Distribution.

We need to spend some time on Hardware discussion. The 2.6 kernel has come a long way and will run on anything from an old 486 to the modern Duocore cpu's along with everything in between. The operative word is "will" run. How well is another matter entirely. You can't expect a speed demon box out of a 486 with 32MB of ram. That being said I did the build up for this how to on an old Dell GX1 with a 500MHz P-III, 384 MB of ram and a 30GB drive. That's very,very conservative hardware. It runs great. Albeit it won't run Quake 4 but it will do everything else just fine. For a general purpose workstation it's fine. It's much more responsive then an equivalent XP box!! Now on my new Dell E1705 the performance is truly awesome. It will play Quake 4 without any problems and the support for the Duocore CPU is there. Ripping DVDs on the Duocore is great. The ability to use DVDRip with dual cpu's is pretty impressive. We'll cover that when we get to setting up DVDRip.

So Lets get to It!!!.

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