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Taking Puppy for a short walk

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Linux
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Puppy 2.0 was released several days ago and I'd been quite anxious to find the time to look at it. This major release brings about some significant changes to the underlying code as well as some visible changes - most notably the mozilla-seamonkey suite and kernel 2.6.16.7.



There aren't a whole lot of gui changes, although we now have a new background. Again, it's a tranquil generic skyscape, but this time it does state the distro and version number. The desktop holds a few more icons than previously for convenient access to some of the more commonly used applications like inkscape, xine, and gnumeric. You immediately know that your sound is working from the "woof woof" one hears when their desktop appears with an introduction in dillo.

        

The developers state that they've completely rewritten the whole startup process and indicate they've improved hardware detection. Although I still had to run the "connect" script upon boot, it did detect my ethernet card and obtain a lease from my dhcpd server. Another change this release is the ram recommendation. Previously 128mb was recommended, but the developers now state this might be a bit low to run the heavier applications such as seamonkey.

Some of the listed changes include:

  • Redesign of the underlying architecture of Puppy for streamlined
    booting from any media, running in a wide range of environments, and
    installation to any media, including CD/DVD, hard drive, USB, Zip.
  • Total rewrite of the boot and shutdown scripts for maximum flexibility.
    No longer does Puppy automatically create a personal save-file on the
    hard drive -- now you are in control and choose exactly where you want it
    (note, you make the choice at the first shutdown). You can even save
    personal files/settings to a floppy disk!
  • Total rewrite of the main Wizards, in particular the Puppy Universal Installer and the CD/DVD Simple Remaster Wizards.
  • Mozilla SeaMonkey suite, with web browser, composer, mail & news and addressbook.
  • Inkscape vector editor.
  • GParted graphical drive partitioning tool.
  • Geany editor replaces the aging Beaver.
  • Perl v5.8.0.
  • Great little applets for the taskbar, to display free memory, volume control, network status.
  • There is considerably more automatic hardware detection, with loading of the correct kernel modules.
  • Kernel version 2.6.16.7.
  • working automatic mouse detection
  • Automatic serial modem detection for true hardware modems
  • Pupsafe - a layer of protection above root.
  • ALSA replaces OSS
  • Bash as default shell
  • Many more little utility applications

        

Control Panel, Setup apps, and Utilities

        

Information Managers, Help File, and Search Tools

        

Multimedia Apps, Games, and File Managers

        

Internet Apps, Networking Tools, and Graphic Processing

    

Word Processors and Mozilla Seamonkey

There are a lot of terrific improvements, especially with hardware detection and setup. It is still the same small fast useful distro to which we've grown accustommed while being updated with a modern kernel and other great additions. Despite ho hum appearances, it's a great little distro and has a fine selection of tools and apps that can be used as a rescue system, to resurrect older computers, or as an everyday workhorse.

Puppy Homepage.
Download Puppy 2.0.
Previous Coverage.

More in Tux Machines

GPL Violations: Grsecurity Carries on Bullying Bruce Perens, Israel Complies with AGPL, Xiaomi Violates GPL

  • Linux's Grsecurity dev team takes blog 'libel' fight to higher court
    Open Source Security, Inc., the maker of the Grsecurity Linux kernel patches, suffered a setback last month when San Francisco magistrate judge Laurel Beeler granted a motion by defendant Bruce Perens to dismiss the company's defamation claim, with the proviso that the tossed legal challenge could be amended. The code biz and its president Brad Spengler sued Perens over a blog post in June in which Perens said that using the firm's Grsecurity software could expose customers to a contributory infringement claim under the terms of the Linux kernel's GPLv2 license. Open Source Security contends that statement has damaged its business.
  • Israel’s Information and Communications Technology Authority Bows to Pressure to Comply with Affero GPL
    Under pressure from open source advocates, the Israeli Information and Communications Technology (ICT) Authority recently shared its first open source software, extensions made by the ICT Authority to the CKAN data portal platform to help make the platform usable in Hebrew. The CKAN software is an open source data portal platform used since 2016 by the ICT Authority to make Israeli government data open and available on its government database website. The CKAN software is licensed under the GNU AGPL Version 3 license, an “ultra-strong” open source license that requires users of modified versions of CKAN software to offer its source code, even in the absence of distribution, to users interacting with software over the Internet.
  • Xiaomi Violating GPL 2.0 License With Mi A1 Kernel Sources
    Xiaomi is in violation of the GPL 2.0 license of the Linux Kernel project by still not releasing the kernel sources for the Mi A1 Android One and has been publicly criticized on the matter by established Android developer Francisco Franco earlier this week. While the smartphone was released in September and the Chinese consumer electronics manufacturer’s official policy is to publicize kernel sources for its devices within three months of their market launch, the Android One edition of the Mi A1 remains undetailed in this regard. Mr. Franco — best known for his work on the Franco Kernel, one of the most popular custom OS cores in the Android ecosystem — had some harsh words for the company on Twitter, calling its laidback approach to publicizing the kernel sources for the Mi A1 “an embarrassment” for the open source community and the type of software it allows it to create its commercial devices in the first place.

Security: Updates, Secure Contexts, EFF, Google, Fedora

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