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The Open Source Car - Unconventional Wisdom and Sustainability

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Most people believe that the future will be powered by hydrogen, but that affordable fuel-cell vehicles are decades away. Hugo Spowers's engineering degree and MBA were sufficient to convince him that the barriers were neither technical nor financial but human. He formed a consortium with BOC, Morgan Cars, QinetiQ and Cranfield and Oxford universities, with funding from the DTI, to design a fuel-cell car with a difference. Spowers' company is called OSCar and the project is called LIFECar - LIghtweight Fuel Efficient Car.

Last week, he and I began a discussion by considering transport on land, air and sea. Aviation is the most problematic: carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides are more damaging at altitude, the fuel is tax-free and consumption is very high. Yet road transport still accounts for 25 per cent of our fossil fuel use.

Where do we start?

Full Story.

No link

Hmmm. No link to actual article? Possibilities:

http://www.netcomposites.com/news.asp?3086
http://www.jalopnik.com/cars/alternative-energy/more-on-morgans-hydrogenpowered-lifecar-127292.php
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2087-1660080,00.html

re: No link

Sorry. Blushing

http://www.autoindustry.co.uk/articles/05-06-06

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You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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