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How Dapper LTS Succeeded To Spoil CUPS Printing

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Yesterday (K)Ubuntu Dapper was released. The final version. I'm sure it is a great release, and most users will find it highly satisfactory for all their needs.

However, this blog is not all huggin' 'n luvin' for Dapper. It is a rant. I want this to be a wake-up call. It will sound negative to most of you. So be it....

Two months ago I blogged about Dapper's printing problems which had shown up in the various beta- and pre-releases.

Seems this is not fixed in the final. Because also yesterday, I received 3 phone calls and 2 written messages from customers or other people (one found me via my "Open Business Club" profile where I had signed up 2 weeks ago... heh) whom I gave paid or unpaid support in the past. All of them told me that Dapper had printing problems; the problems appear regardless of whether you run it from the Live CD or wether it is installed onto the harddisk.

Now, I did not have a current Dapper downloaded yet. So I could not verify myself. One of my contacts (he just had a fresh install from the Live CD completed) offered me to let me ssh in remotely so that I could have a closer look at the problem. But, alas!, no ssh login was possible. The openssh-server package seems to not be installed by default. WTF?? How are community or professional support people supposed to help Dapper users if it is not possible to remotely log into the system??

Full Post = Part One.

Part Two.

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