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WiFi

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Linux 101

I installed Linux Mint on my Dell Latitue D630 and I love it!! While the lap top was wired to the internet, I could do anything I wanted to do.

But I have wifi. And, the steps I found online did not help me get wifi set up.

When I type "iwconfig" from the command line, it says "no wireless extensions"

Please help. I need this.

WiCD/NetworkManager

I am assuming that you use NetworkManager in Mint (the icon that corresponds to connection with the symbols of connection in the tray), but have you tried WiCD? Are you getting no Wi-Fi connections listed at all? Have you checked that the laptop has no physical switch to enable Wi-Fi? Some have that...

dell latitude wifi

On the left side of the computer is a 3-position wireless switch

1 - "off" position - Disables wireless devices

2 - "on" position - Enables wireless devices

3 - "momentary" position - Scans for WLAN networks (see Dell Wi-Fi Catcher™ Network Locator)

To the right of this is a Wi-Fi Catcher light.

DELL WI-FI CATCHER NETWORK LOCATOR
----------------------------------
The wireless switch on your Dell computer uses the Dell Wi-Fi Catcher Network Locator to scan specifically for WiFi WLAN in your vicinity. For more information about the wireless switch, see wireless switch.

To scan for WiFi WLAN, slide and hold the switch in the "momentary" position for a few seconds. The Wi-Fi Catcher Network Locator functions regardless of whether your computer is turned on or off, in hibernate mode, or in standby mode, as long as the switch is configured through Dell QuickSet or the BIOS (system setup program) to control WiFi network connections.

Because the Wi-Fi Catcher Network Locator is disabled and not configured for use when your computer is shipped to you, you must first use Dell QuickSet to enable and configure the switch to control WiFi network connections.

Don't know whether this helps or not. Good luck.

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