Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Puppy Power

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Puppy Linux is an excellent choice for powering the plethora of dated hardware in countries with strapped IT-budgets. By utilizing existing hardware, it not only saves the hardware cost, but being available for free also saves software costs. Its developer, Barry Kauler recently wrote (http://www.puppyos.com/olpc/) why he thinks Puppy would make an ideal OS for the (http://laptop.org/) One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project. His experience of running Puppy on a 433MHz box with 128MB Compact Flash card and no hard disk is impressive, once you read the benchmarks. The box boots up in about 46 seconds and powers-off in about 20. While running, apart from big applications like Mozilla Seamonkey, AbiWord, GNumeric, and Inkscape, which take between three to twelve seconds to start, all other small applications take about a second or less!

The Puppy Linux team is currently working on the next revolutionary version Puppy 2.0, http://puppyos.com/development/howpuppyworks.html, which just hit beta and will soon be released. Barry was kind enough to find time between developing Puppy and burning CDs for people who have purchased Puppy Linux CDs and made donations, to answer a few questions on what makes Puppy one of the best distributions.
Mayank Sharma: Barry, can you please give us some background information about yourself and Puppy?

Barry Kauler: I'm a retired university lecturer, now doing a little part-time work. Puppy started about three years ago as a fun thing to work on sometimes, but has now taken over my life. There are several other guys heavily into development and testing, the core team, but there are lots and lots of others who contribute, like provide site hosting or user reports.

MS: Puppy has come a long way since its inception. From a little known minimalistic distro to one of the most user-friendly and active ones, how has the journey been?

Full Interview.

More in Tux Machines

CuBox-i4Pro Review

A bundled microSD card arrives preinserted into the rear of the CuBox-i, and it’s loaded with a version of Google’s Android operating system. Interestingly, SolidRun has gone to the effort of seeking the certifications required to load the Google Apps suite onto the card, meaning users receive Google Mail, YouTube, Google Maps and full access to Google Play straight out of the box. An even newer build, based on the latest Android 4.4 KitKat branch, can be downloaded from SolidRun’s website and provides an entirely useable desktop Android experience. Read more

Working on 3.19 – the kernel column

Linus Torvalds announced the release of Linux kernel version 3.18 in time for the holidays. In his mail, Linus noted that the previous RC, release candidate 7, had been “tiny” (in terms of changes and bugfixes), so it was time to get the final release out. The latest kernel includes support for storing AMD Radeon GPU buffers in regular application memory (building upon similar work done by Intel for kernel 3.16), and overlayfs (which we have covered previously), amongst a number of other less interesting new features. A full summary is provided at Kernel Newbies. Read more

The top 10 rookie open source projects

Open source has become the industry's engine of innovation. This year, for example, growth in projects related to Docker containerization trumped every other rookie area -- and not coincidentally reflected the most exciting area of enterprise technology overall. At the very least, the projects described here provide a window on what the global open source developer community is thinking, which is fast becoming a good indicator of where we're headed. Read more

First thoughts on KaOS 2014.12

The latest snapshot of this rolling release distribution includes initial support for UEFI, the KDE 4.14 desktop, systemd version 218 and the Qupzilla web browser. I mention Qupzilla because I feel it is a rare gem in the open source world, a quick capable browser that perhaps does not get the attention it deserves. KaOS is available in just one edition, a 64-bit x86 build. The ISO we download for KaOS is 1.6GB in size. Read more