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Puppy Power

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Linux
Interviews

Puppy Linux is an excellent choice for powering the plethora of dated hardware in countries with strapped IT-budgets. By utilizing existing hardware, it not only saves the hardware cost, but being available for free also saves software costs. Its developer, Barry Kauler recently wrote (http://www.puppyos.com/olpc/) why he thinks Puppy would make an ideal OS for the (http://laptop.org/) One Laptop Per Child (OLPC) project. His experience of running Puppy on a 433MHz box with 128MB Compact Flash card and no hard disk is impressive, once you read the benchmarks. The box boots up in about 46 seconds and powers-off in about 20. While running, apart from big applications like Mozilla Seamonkey, AbiWord, GNumeric, and Inkscape, which take between three to twelve seconds to start, all other small applications take about a second or less!

The Puppy Linux team is currently working on the next revolutionary version Puppy 2.0, http://puppyos.com/development/howpuppyworks.html, which just hit beta and will soon be released. Barry was kind enough to find time between developing Puppy and burning CDs for people who have purchased Puppy Linux CDs and made donations, to answer a few questions on what makes Puppy one of the best distributions.
Mayank Sharma: Barry, can you please give us some background information about yourself and Puppy?

Barry Kauler: I'm a retired university lecturer, now doing a little part-time work. Puppy started about three years ago as a fun thing to work on sometimes, but has now taken over my life. There are several other guys heavily into development and testing, the core team, but there are lots and lots of others who contribute, like provide site hosting or user reports.

MS: Puppy has come a long way since its inception. From a little known minimalistic distro to one of the most user-friendly and active ones, how has the journey been?

Full Interview.

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