Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Interview with Andreas Jaeger, SUSE Linux

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

Following the highly intensive 9-month development effort of hundreds of full-time coders and volunteer contributors, SUSE Linux 10.1 was finally released to the public on 11 May 2006. Based on some of the early reviews, it appears that the new product is possibly one of the best operating systems available today and another reason to celebrate the enormous progress desktop Linux has made over the past couple of years. But the long development cycle didn't pass without its fair share of glitches, delays and unexpected feature enhancements in the middle of the beta testing process. We asked Andreas Jaeger, Project Manager at SUSE Linux, about his experiences with managing a massive and complex software project, and to give us some hints about the next SUSE release, the development of which is scheduled to start in just a couple of weeks.

* * * * *

DW: Andreas, thank you very much for your time and congratulations on your new release. If I understand it correctly, you are the release manager for SUSE Linux. What exactly are your responsibilities?

AJ: My job title is project manager which means I am the SUSE Linux project lead and as such, I act as the release manager for the SUSE Linux distribution and I basically coordinate work on our SUSE Linux distribution. So to say, I am the link to product management, the different development teams at Novell and to our community. I'm not responsible for the marketing material, e.g. the look of the retail box.

The features in the product are requested by product management, taking into account the feedback received from the openSUSE community and our customers. To achieve this, I work with various development and testing teams inside Novell and coordinate these. I'm also taking care of localization and documentation. Most of my responsibilities are delegated which means I have to handle a number of escalations.

DW: Can you describe your typical day during the SUSE Linux 10.1 testing?

Full Story.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • DataBasin - object inspector and updates
    First, the underlying DataBasinKit framework got an important update.
  • In-demand dev skills, understanding licensing, and more open source news
  • Higher ed systems expanding access to open-source materials
    Open-source learning technology is at the core of higher education for institutions that want to reach broader audiences with very strict ideas about how convenient learning should be. But developing these initiatives does not happen quickly or easily. It requires strong leadership in information technology, expertise to determine which solutions work best for a campus, and a financial commitment to making sure the technology is sustainable.
  • Proxmark Pro Proxmark3 Standalone Open Source RFID Tester (video)
    Rysc Corp has unveiled a new open source board in the form of the Proxmark Pro which now offers a true standalone client and RFID test instrument, check out the video below to learn more. The Proxmark Pro will feature an FPGA with 5 times the logic cells of the Proxmark3 and will remove the need to switch between HF and LF bit streams during operation, to use developers.
  • ErupteD Brings Vulkan To The D Programming Language
    The D programming language is just the latest to have support for Vulkan alongside C++, Rust (via Vulkano, if you missed that project), Go, and many other modern languages getting bindings for this Khronos Group high performance graphics API. Should you not be familiar with the D language, see Wikipedia.

Leftovers: Security