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Interview with Andreas Jaeger, SUSE Linux

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SUSE

Following the highly intensive 9-month development effort of hundreds of full-time coders and volunteer contributors, SUSE Linux 10.1 was finally released to the public on 11 May 2006. Based on some of the early reviews, it appears that the new product is possibly one of the best operating systems available today and another reason to celebrate the enormous progress desktop Linux has made over the past couple of years. But the long development cycle didn't pass without its fair share of glitches, delays and unexpected feature enhancements in the middle of the beta testing process. We asked Andreas Jaeger, Project Manager at SUSE Linux, about his experiences with managing a massive and complex software project, and to give us some hints about the next SUSE release, the development of which is scheduled to start in just a couple of weeks.

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DW: Andreas, thank you very much for your time and congratulations on your new release. If I understand it correctly, you are the release manager for SUSE Linux. What exactly are your responsibilities?

AJ: My job title is project manager which means I am the SUSE Linux project lead and as such, I act as the release manager for the SUSE Linux distribution and I basically coordinate work on our SUSE Linux distribution. So to say, I am the link to product management, the different development teams at Novell and to our community. I'm not responsible for the marketing material, e.g. the look of the retail box.

The features in the product are requested by product management, taking into account the feedback received from the openSUSE community and our customers. To achieve this, I work with various development and testing teams inside Novell and coordinate these. I'm also taking care of localization and documentation. Most of my responsibilities are delegated which means I have to handle a number of escalations.

DW: Can you describe your typical day during the SUSE Linux 10.1 testing?

Full Story.

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